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Discussion Starter #1
Shot my new Model 1917 today (it's a manly gun) and it was shooting nice groups but printing slightly high and left with a 6:00 hold at 25 yards offhand. I'd say 4-5" left. It could have been user error as the gun jumps a good bit and takes some getting used to. Anyone else have this problem?
 

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Were you "benching" it when you shot the groups? That is the only way that I can check them. Sandbags work great or an actual rest. Improper trigger squeeze can cause the muzzle to go to the left when pulling the trigger. You need to check that first.
 

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reddogge; the "group" you got is NOT unusual for 1917s,and as M2HB correctly said,bench resting is the way to go-BUT-with the proviso,that any "final" adjustments of the sights(by filing) will be done from the offhand position. You did not say what load you were using;these guns were regulated for the 230 gr fmj .45 auto at the factory as far as front sight,but NOT windage.

Col, Charles Askins related the tale of having to "bend" most of the front sights on the 4" Colt New Services,in .38 Special,that his Border Patrol bought in the 1930s,to get the correct windage.

It does not take much bending of the sight to get it correct,but make sure that BOTH the load,and the "hold" are the ones you will be using for the bulk of your shooting.For example,Saturday,I "deflowered" a 53 yr. old O. Police,and was surprised at the difference that a Pachmeyer grip adapter made at 25 yards.

Now,how to bend the sight: First make sure that the 1917 has Colt Patent marks on the top. I bought a reblued,mongrel of a 1917,that had one of the barrels produced ny Springfield Armory in the 1930s. Sorry to say that the U.S. Govt crew didn't affix the sight to the barrel as well as Colt!! It snapped off,and this has never happened with any of the Colt N.S. that I've had to do this to. The S.A. barrel was brazed on,and the "groove" to center the sight was not as deep as Colt. Anyway,I don't like "pliers",even smooth jawed,padded ones,so I use a padded vice to put the front sight in,and it takes very little effort to "bend it" by moving the frame. BEND THE SIGHT IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION YOU WANT THE BULLETS TO MOVE TO! So,in your case,you will want to move it LEFT. Go SLOW,a bit at a time,and "a little goes a long way"(you wont have the sight looking like the Leaning Tower of Pisa!). I am fortunate to have a range in my "backyard",so trips back and forth to the vice are e-z. It is possible that the sight was bent to the right,a little before you got it,and the bending will lower the top in relationship to the rear sight top,thus getting the lower group you obtained.

I've seen some fixed sighted guns so badly aligned by a "previous owner",that they wouldn't stay on an 8 x 10 sheet of paper at 25 yards(or less),so you shouldn't have much of a problem,but again,Go Slow,and test fire 5 rds. for each adjustment you make. Good Luck,Bud
 

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According to Colt's literature, their pre-war revolvers were sighted at the factory to print 3/4" high at 15 yards, if you want factory specs. This also was the era of using the "high thumb" hold for target shooting, where (for righties) the thumb rested near the cylinder latch, and you compensated for shots pulling left by increasing pressure with your thumb. Personally, I have both hands wrapped around the big thumper to protect my forehead
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by reddogge:
Shot my new Model 1917 today (it's a manly gun) and it was shooting nice groups but printing slightly high and left with a 6:00 hold at 25 yards offhand. I'd say 4-5" left. It could have been user error as the gun jumps a good bit and takes some getting used to. Anyone else have this problem?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>It could have been user error as the gun jumps a good bit and takes some getting used to.

high left @ 10-11 oclock for right handed shooter with one hand hold, usually will relate to pushing,(anticipating recoil) or no follow through, same shot posistion for left handed shooter same hold = healing the gun (posistion on grip to low)try realinging your grip, or not anticipating the recoil. the above is not an expert opinion, but from a long time target shooting competitor, and coach.
the error if it is in the shooter just need's a little fine tuning, as well might the gun itself. repeatability shows that both the gun and the shooter are 98% correct, so the difference is in the fine tuning, different posistions of the impact on the the target, as it relates to a clock face, will usually provide nessacary feedback to shooter on how to correct form, usual culprits are breaking wrist, both up and down,thunbing the gun,trigger finger squeeze posistion, squeezing finger tip from aparticular joint on the finger, all of these are tips that provide nessary information on how to tune a shooter for serious competition, and make the difference when the competition is tough
 

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Most of us modern gun nuts have too much money,along with that,we have too many guns. Now bear with me a minute. In the past a gun nut might have one pistol,one shot gun,and one rifle to do all things he required.They became so used to where the bullets struck in relation to where the sights were that he used the old Kentucky windage principle and held the sights to where he knew the bullet would impact the target.We have lost that ability due to the fact we have so many guns being familiar with any one is impossible.BUT there is a cure for that problem..I will sacrifice myself for the good of all by receiving all excess guns you have,save one shotgun,one rifle and one handgun,,,no maybe you should keep a 22 and a centerfire handgun for luck.All others ship to me post paid and I'll suffer alone for the good of the nation.NO NO don't applaude,,it is the least I can do for AMERICA.........modoc


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Keep your powder dry,but not hot.
Guns are for Gunners
 

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reddogge;Glad you are enjoying the 1917. Where you mentioned small hands,get a Grip Adapter,and you will be amazed at the difference!! Seriously,I have wide hands,but short fingers,and I have adapters on all my New Services,and I use a pair of Colt post 1942 plastic stocks,that are checkered to get better control(and to save my original hard rubber and wood stocks from possible splitting,especially if I am bench resting.) The adapter and plastic stocks take less than 5 minutes to install. Bud
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good feedback from all. Since it handles differently from a 1911 or a S&W 27 I have to spend more time experimenting with it. I feel it's user error here. I have relatively small hands and the smooth wood grips don't help. I am shooting two handed but didn't cock the piece with my left hand like I usually do with a revolver. I'll try benching it, shooting more, paying attention to hand pressure, etc. before bending front sights. I also want to experiment with cast bullets and handloads for fun. I was surprised it grouped as well as it did, just not where I was aiming. It's a military revolver in original but not pristine condition.
 
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