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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These bullets were found at the Civil War site of the battle of Jenkins Ferry on the Saline River in Arkansas. The battle was fought on April 30, 1864. All the bullets were dug, some found as deep at 14 inches. At the time of the battle the Saline River had flooded the surrounding area, and most of the battle was fought in knee deep water. Almost half the bullets are "drops", accounting for their unfired condition.

The second photo shows a bullet picked up and chewed by a hog at some time shortly after the battle. The hogs would scrounge for acorns in the leaves and thinking the bullet was an acorn try chewing it.



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The "War in the West" (west of the Mississippi) got everything that no one else wanted, so a lot of odd bullets are found. Mixed in with the Enfield type and the "three ringers" shown are a few in .54 caliber. The Enfield type .54 bullets were thought to have been made at the Marshall, Texas Confederate Arsenal.
 

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I know that some men also chewed on bullet's while being operated on for wound's after the battle, could this be one ? or can some one tell by the teeth marks that it was a hog ? just wondering.
Very nice bullet collection, I use to dig civil war bullets from old battle fields here in Marietta Ga, a great hobby at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The bullet shown was found in the area of the battle. As soon as the Federal troops got across the Saline River the battle broke off and they headed to Little Rock, and the Confederate troops pulled back south to their camps, so no battlefield surgery. Also, the bullet had been fired.

This is a .69 round ball that is hog chewed from another battlefield.

 

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Domestic hogs set loose from action of the troops were a very real menace to the dead and wounded left on battlefields overnight. One wounded officer left on the field at Gettysburg described the horror of hogs rooting through the dead, eating their flesh. He is said to have survived by keeping them at bay with his sword. It's now believed several photographs taken by the Alexander Gardner crew on July 5-7 1863 of dead Confederate soldiers on or about the Rose farm were molested by hogs prior to being photographed.
 

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Great battle field finds. I have found some mini's in the most unlike places in Michigan farm fields. I am guessing that they were from surplus rifles after the war
 

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Great battle field finds. I have found some mini's in the most unlike places in Michigan farm fields. I am guessing that they were from surplus rifles after the war
Very well could have been, Northern troops had the option to buy their weapons upon discharge, and many did. Was there a training camp in the area? That could also explain the bullets found. Camp Curtain in Harrisburg was a large training camp for Northern soldiers and I've searched the area, (now suburbs of the city) and came up with only later finds, .45/70 casings from Frankfort Arsenal! The camp was closed after the war for any military use, yet the area remained farm land for some years after, probably up to WWI and no troops during the Spanish American War were trained there. Maybe possible some P.A.N.G. or militia unit used the area for a field day, but doubtful they would have used private land. In this case I would have to guess the casings came from civilian usage and just happened to be where Camp Curtain was since there's no reference to any military usage of the land after 1865.
 

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Interesting! I had a great, great cousin that was killed there. He was in the Texas 7th Calvary (a Captain) and was killed trying to get back from Arkansas into Texas. He was one of 4 cousins from the same family that fought for the South. The others were captured at 10 Mile Island or Vicksburg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Interesting! I had a great, great cousin that was killed there. He was in the Texas 7th Calvary (a Captain) and was killed trying to get back from Arkansas into Texas. He was one of 4 cousins from the same family that fought for the South. The others were captured at 10 Mile Island or Vicksburg.
There is a really good book of letters a Texan, Elijah Petty, who was sent to Arkansas wrote his family. He wrote his wife and each child their own letter, and the letters survived to be published in a book. In one of his letters he referred to Arkansas as "that awful Arkansas. He was killed at the battle of Pleasant Hill which is south of Shreveport, Louisiana. If I remember correctly he was in Walker's Texas Division, and the men became known as "Walker's Greyhounds" for the amount of marching they did. Walker's Division fought at Jenkin's Ferry.
 
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