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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished watching Firecreek 1968 with Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda. What is the deal of making a swing out cylinder gun made to look like a SAA by adding an ejector rod which is totally useless? I couldn't believe my eyes. Why do movies pull this type of crap and what is the deal with guys getting shot that go flying across the room. Any one else name a few flix that has issues with displaying BS guns in action? Just don't mention the "Good the Bad and the Ugly. That is one awesome flick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have seen others with pre civil war and they were using cartridges and revolvers which weren't even out yet. It's funny how you pay attention to these things when you are into firearms. My favorite is when they use double action revolvers to fire rapidly and you can see plain as day that they shouldn't be in the movie what so ever since they weren't invented yet.
 

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What gets me is the Civil War movies having SAA's and 1892 Winchesters. I cannot get interested in them.
It's a matter of time and budget that the studio is willing to spend on props. If they bought an original and changed it so it's non-firing, this could be costly and could ruin an original gun. If they they get a replica made, this could take lots of time depending on how many guns they would need for the movie. Would the majority of their target audience care? It's quite a balancing act. I say just enjoy the story they're trying to tell.
 

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It's a matter of time and budget that the studio is willing to spend on props.
If you want to a good laugh about movie prop weapons and budget, watch "Abraham Lincoln Vs. Zombies" on Netflix.

From what I can tell, the firearms used range from an original Colt's percussion revolver (that belonged to one actors) to one of those wooden muskets from the gift shop at the fort where filming took place (which also seems to be where they got General Stonewall Jackson's hat). They also had a Single Action Army as well as a flintlock musket which could fire without the hammer moving!

And as an added treat for us older folks, the guy playing Abraham Lincoln talks just like Lloyd Bridges.
 

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Hollywood began converting double action revolvers to look like single action Colt's in the very early days.
Actors are actors, not gun handlers. It was simply easier for an actor to fire a DA then to fumble with an unfamiliar single action and waste time and money having to do it over again.
All the untrained actor had to do was pull the trigger and move on to the next scene.

As for the use of incorrect guns and gear, Hollywood was making movies not historically correct educational films.
It was simply easier for the prop men to quickly load a revolver cylinder with a fresh load of blank cartridges then to waste time and money slowly loading a muzzle loading percussion revolver.
 

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In using a New Service DA revolver, with ejector rod added, I don't think Hollywood is trying to make a SAA. What is being done is an approximation of the 1878 Double Action Colt, which was a very real weapon with side ejector rod. The fault likes in the swing out cylinder, but in movie use, the New Service with rod certainly does approximate the 1878. Other Colts, such as the Official Police with rod on the side of the barrel can stand in for the Thunderer and a Police Positive can certainly be used with ejector rod added as a Lightning.

Besides, if the film is supposed to be happening sometime after 1890, then double action "modern" style revolvers were certainly starting to be available.

If you're going to complain about Firecreek what about Henry Fonda's modern Stockman style hat? Oh, and were all the saddles of 19th Century design?
Nothing worse than seeing a modern pummeled/cantled saddle in a 19th Century depiction! Right? Can't remember, but were the sixgun rigs Buscadero?
Oh my gosh!!! And double gosh!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Hi there KMKCOLT;

Actually, the first cartridge revolvers came out before the Civil War even began. They were produced around 1856 by Smith & Wesson.

Bud

I have seen others with pre civil war and they were using cartridges and revolvers which weren't even out yet. It's funny how you pay attention to these things when you are into firearms. My favorite is when they use double action revolvers to fire rapidly and you can see plain as day that they shouldn't be in the movie what so ever since they weren't invented yet.
 

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Many a Saturday morning was spent in front of the TV showing all the real cowboys shooting their guns during the chase.
I think I've counted 15 shots without reloading, it's really fun now that you look at the guns more than the storyline.
 

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Hi there KMKCOLT;

Actually, the first cartridge revolvers came out before the Civil War even began. They were produced around 1856 by Smith & Wesson.

Bud
in .22 Short...yeahhh...


Lol...

One does not tend to see many of those 'Tip-Ups' in the Movies though...


But I have occasionally seen an old 5 Shot S & W Break Top .38 S&W being used in Movies, one which comes to mind, a BG got shot with one even.

That was kind of interesting, especially as the Movie was set in present time.
 

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When the stagecoach was being attacked by Indians in the (original) movie "Stagecoach" John Carradine had a tip up revolver. Certainly looked like a S & W. He played the part of a gambler. Not sure if it was a .22 or not it appeared to be a bit larger caliber. There was one round left in it and he was going to kill a female passenger, but then gets killed beforehand of course.

John Wayne used the large loop Winchester which we know didn't exist, but the revolvers were SAA and the ****** were using bow & arrows as well as the Springfield Trapdoor carbine.

But I know this because I watched it Saturday.
 

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When the stagecoach was being attacked by Indians is the (original) movie "Stagecoach" John Carradine had a tip up revolver. Certainly looked like a S & W. He played the part of a gambler. Not sure if it was a .22 or not it appeared to be a bit larger caliber. There was one round left in it and he was going to kill a female passenger, but then gets killed beforehand of course.

John Wayne used the large loop Winchester which we know didn't exist, but the revolvers were SAA and the ****** were using bow & arrows as well as the Springfield Trapdoor carbine.

But I know this because I watched it Saturday.
Hey! I watched that too. Wayne was a smoothie with the girl.
It looked tough to load those trapdoors on horseback at a full gallop.
 

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When the stagecoach was being attacked by Indians is the (original) movie "Stagecoach" John Carradine had a tip up revolver. Certainly looked like a S & W. He played the part of a gambler. Not sure if it was a .22 or not it appeared to be a bit larger caliber. There was one round left in it and he was going to kill a female passenger, but then gets killed beforehand of course.

John Wayne used the large loop Winchester which we know didn't exist, but the revolvers were SAA and the ****** were using bow & arrows as well as the Springfield Trapdoor carbine.

But I know this because I watched it Saturday.

I'll be darned!

That ( seeing an S & W 'Tip-Up' in an Old West Movie ) would be a rare sight, I am sure.

Of course after some while with the .22, S & W did come out with somewhat the larger Frame Tip-Ups in .32 Rimfire also.

I imagine Hollywood still had Boxes of .32 RF Blanks on hand in the '30s...or who knows, maybe into the '40s even!

Quite a while ago, I got some old ex-Hollywood early 1900s Boxes of Blanks for the .38 ACP and .32 ACP and .380 ACP and I forget what all else, some odds-n-ends Blanks also, 9mm Luger, .44-40...32 Short...38 S&W.

Darned Mice got into them though some years ago and kind of made a mess out of the old Boxes unfortunately.

Boxes were typical Factory Boxes of the Period, Rubber Stamped across the Top in Red with the word "Blanks" or "BLANK" or something like that.
 

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Many a Saturday morning was spent in front of the TV showing all the real cowboys shooting their guns during the chase.
I think I've counted 15 shots without reloading, it's really fun now that you look at the guns more than the storyline.
Small change of pace: what do you think the horses felt with sixguns going off right between their ears????????? YIKES.
 
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