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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know she is not pretty but my Gunsmith said she is good to go. Built in 1916 which makes her 104 years old. Some staining on the bluing for many years inside the Holster but it's not pitted. She is a 1916 Government model with the letter C in front of the serial numbers. I hope the pics come out good. I have a letter coming from Colt to see if she may have been used in WWI? What you see in the pics is just part of what she came with. Mag pouch has two more WWI magazine inside.
 

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Shoot, it looks great to me. I love a 100 year old, carried but cared for old gun. The silk pillow 99% ones I can't figure out. Why did an owner, then his sons, then their sons NEVER holster it, shoot it, or get a nick on the stocks from setting it down on a table? Seems unlikely. I prefer ones just like yours - you can shoot them.
 

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A gun that is shot can be well cared for, and a gun that is never shot can be allowed to rust. How they were used has nothing to do with their value today, but their condition does.

My 42 year old Colt Python was bought as a shooter and continues to be a shooter. May not shoot but a dozen rounds, or maybe 50 rounds in a session. Never carried in a holster as no need to, and only shows wear in the places that accumulates from normal shooting.

If everyone wanted the same thing, it would be too high to buy.
 

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Shoot, it looks great to me. I love a 100 year old, carried but cared for old gun. The silk pillow 99% ones I can't figure out. Why did an owner, then his sons, then their sons NEVER holster it, shoot it, or get a nick on the stocks from setting it down on a table? Seems unlikely. I prefer ones just like yours - you can shoot them.
I like 'em both ways
 

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A gun that is shot can be well cared for, and a gun that is never shot can be allowed to rust. How they were used has nothing to do with their value today, but their condition does.

My 42 year old Colt Python was bought as a shooter and continues to be a shooter. May not shoot but a dozen rounds, or maybe 50 rounds in a session. Never carried in a holster as no need to, and only shows wear in the places that accumulates from normal shooting.

If everyone wanted the same thing, it would be too high to buy.
Use causes wear, but it's much slower than not preserving a gun. I've got some old ones too that have had a lot of firing, and even put in holsters and hiked with that look great. One Ruger Mk II I bought almost 40 years ago, and could claim "new, unfired" and many would believe it, not noticing a little muzzle edge wear, but I've shot it thousands of times. If they looked inside the action, there would be signs of that bolt going back and forth all those times.

I have a Shiloh that I shot in competition for about 5 years. I was very careful with it and kept it oiled. It's got some case hardening fading from my hands, and a few dings. It was used. If I had just left it in the safe, it would still be 100%. If I forgot to oil it and left it out in the rain it would be 75%. The OPs gun looks like it was carried a lot, as in daily for a lifetime, but was carefully wiped down pretty often. It has wear, not rust.
 

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About 20 years ago I found a 1954 Trooper, 38 spl in the used case at a store I liked. Priced at $180, and I couldn't pass it up. It was an old LEO pistol. Someone spent their whole career carrying it. Holster wear to the extreme, type 1 target grips with right side worn from right arm rubbing against it 8+ hours a day. Had his name and badge number scratched on them.

Barrel and chambers were pristine, did they do regular qualifying back then? Action lockes up like the famed bank vault. Even now it shoots better than I can! I can keep it in the 9 - 10 ring at 7 yards, even newer guns can't do better than that for me. Lol

God Bless
Daryl
 

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A C prefix indicates a Government Model rather than a military M1911 so chances are against it being used by the military. But you never know, it may have been a private purchase by an officer. I was unable to read the serial number in the photo with certainty but if you can post the full number I will check Goddard's book and see if there is any shipping information on it.
The holster is for a Model 1917 revolver and incorrect for that gun. The magazine and mag pouch look correct for that era. Looks like a good shooter and the Colt letter may provide a nice surprise.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
A C prefix indicates a Government Model rather than a military M1911 so chances are against it being used by the military. But you never know, it may have been a private purchase by an officer. I was unable to read the serial number in the photo with certainty but if you can post the full number I will check Goddard's book and see if there is any shipping information on it.
The holster is for a Model 1917 revolver and incorrect for that gun. The magazine and mag pouch look correct for that era. Looks like a good shooter and the Colt letter may provide a nice surprise.
I have the Holster that came with the 1911, it was just a pain to pull every thing out of the display case. Here is the pisc that shows the Holster, web belt and canteen. That 1917 Holster goes with my 1917 revolver .
 

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Nice collection, but as Walter Rego said, your pistol is a Government Model, not a 1911.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Nice collection, but as Walter Rego said, your pistol is a Government Model, not a 1911.
If it's not a 1911l then what is it? Thank you for your comment, but I know it's a 1911 Government Model 45 ACP.. Pre WWI Officers did buy these as a private purchases before we entered WWI.
 

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It is a Colt's Government Model. Technically, there is no such thing as a "1911 Government Model."

The .45 caliber auto loading pistol made by Colt's for commercial sale was the Government Model.

The Model of 1911 was the pistol made for the U.S. military by Colt's, as well as by Springfield Armory and Remington-UMC.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
It is a Colt's Government Model. Technically, there is no such thing as a "1911 Government Model."

The .45 caliber auto loading pistol made by Colt's for commercial sale was the Government Model.

The Model of 1911 was the pistol made for the U.S. military by Colt's, as well as by Springfield Armory and Remington-UMC.
I did not know that? I thought it still was a 1911 but I got it now. I was under the impression that the Military called it a M1911 and the civilian model was just the 1911. Thank you.
 

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You're welcome
 

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Discussion Starter #16
This is why we get confused with all the miss information out on the web. This is only one web site of many that calls the Government issued 45 acp a 1911. I think the sale price is nuts anyways.
 

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up196 (previous post) indicated the Government Model is not supposed to be referred to as a 1911. My Government Model was made/shipped in 1916.
 

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For those that have it, see page 137 (Russia), in the Clawson Government Model book (second edition).

Clawson states,.. "The Imperial Russian government purchased some 51,100 commercial caliber .45 Government Model pistols from Colt." These Pistols were/are not all inclusive and are in the range between C23000 and C89000. So, it might be important to Letter all Pistols in this range (particularly the early ones). ?

Clawson does cover, what one might use, when referring to pre-1924 and post-1923 (basically,...there were/are exceptions to the transition) Government Model Pistols. He does it directly on page 27, and then with his usage of the term 1911, Model of 1911 (Model 1911/M1911), 1911A1, Model of 1911A1 (Model 1911A1/M1911A1), and Government Model throughout his Government Model book. (CHAPTER TWO covers "Government Model Pistols 1912 to 1920", CHAPTER FOUR covers "Government Model Pistols 1919 to 1924", and CHAPTER FIVE covers "Government Model Pistols 1924 to 1942".)

Clawson, on page 27, discusses the confusion, in Sentences two and three. Sentence three: "Due to the confusion caused by this military-implied name, it is sometimes referred to as Commercial 1911 or 1911A1." Then he uses the terms above (1911, Model of 1911 (Model 1911/M1911), 1911A1, Model of 1911A1 (Model 1911A1/M1911A1), and Government Model) throughout his book with apparent clarity. ? There are even two examples back on page 137 (Russia) in Paragraph three; ", Model 1911s were listed among the various pistols used to assassinate the"..., and the last sentence..."military aid after World War II, which included a few "English Order" Model 1911 pistols." Is it Clear what he means in his usage throughout his Government Model book. ?
 
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