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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

After seeing Yahoody's go at fitting a set of one piece grips my civilian H.N. stamped I recently picked up was in need of a new set.they were damaged after being under water in a flood for two weeks 50yrs ago.
This is my first attempt and im not much of a wood worker.
The blank is from Dave Lanara, and i have to say you would not find a better blank to work with, a few emails to dave showing the progress and his very helpfull advice on how to progress through the stages.
A couple of emails to Yahoody for some good advice also.
Firstly like Yahoody said, its not that hard, I think the most important advice to take on board, is be prepared to spend atleast 6-8 hrs first attempt, dont rush, you wont do it in 2 hrs, thats the mindset I had throughout.

Hear are the results, and a big thanks to Yahoody and Dave.


 

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Fine job Tony! Scary aint it ;) Next one will be a lot easier.

Now all you need to do is make up another pair, but first have a hammer, some big fence staples, a propane torch, some old time axle grease, may be some cow's blood all on hand to get the 2nd pair to match the finish on the fine old smoke pole ya got there! Those are some mighty fine grips you have there, Tony, well done :)

 

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Tony, Good job!! As Yahoody indicated, some distressing of the grips would make them match the gun's condition much better. I do notice that you did not build in much of a 'flair' towards the bottom of the grips that one sees in factory grips. I have done quite a few sets in ivory for SAA's and I have not acquired the knack for getting that 'flair' in my grips either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Fine job Tony! Scary aint it ;) Next one will be a lot easier.

Now all you need to do is make up another pair, but first have a hammer, some big fence staples, a propane torch, some old time axle grease, may be some cow's blood all on hand to get the 2nd pair to match the finish on the fine old smoke pole ya got there! Those are some mighty fine grips you have there, Tony, well done :)


Yes ageing will be as much fun as shaping them, ill work on that and try to match my other wood grip sa'a.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tony, Good job!! As Yahoody indicated, some distressing of the grips would make them match the gun's condition much better. I do notice that you did not build in much of a 'flair' towards the bottom of the grips that one sees in factory grips. I have done quite a few sets in ivory for SAA's and I have not acquired the knack for getting that 'flair' in my grips either.
Yes that flair, and getting the taper on the base, thats were the grip skill comes in, and getting the feel like the origionals is a challange, a second set in the new year will be the go.
 

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What a fine job Tony and you had plenty of patience too. I would like to see it again in a few years after it has been used. It takes a special person who has the skill, patience and time to do what you did. Keep up the good work.
 

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Real nice work. Maybe I see a partnership starting up here. You guys taking orders?
 
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saintclair said:
I don't recall Yahoody detailing how he gets the flair in his grips!! Hint, Hint!




I appreciate you asking. If folks are really interested I can get some better pictures and detail how I profile my grips in another post this weekend. Guess I better order a few more pairs of grips blanks from Dave first though, before he runs out and the prices go up.

When folks start talking about grip profile/contours this is a good primer and pictures on the subject..

Grip Profiles - Classic Single Action - Custom grips and Gunsmithing


 

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May I ask what is wrong with the grips which were already on the revolver? Are they the ones damaged by water? If they are the original water damaged grips I think it's a mistake to replace them. And if they're grips from another gun or homemade grips, they certainly complement the condition of the revolver.

I'm not trying to take away from the nice job you have done on grip making. Just can't understand why you want to make a new set of grips, then finish them and beat them up to match the condition of the revolver, when that's what you already have on the gun now??

Bottom line, I think the revolver looks cool as is.

 

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Hi There,

tony56, you did an excellent job! Congrats!

johngross said:
May I ask what is wrong with the grips which were already on the revolver? Are they the ones damaged by water? If they are the original water damaged grips I think it's a mistake to replace them. And if they're grips from another gun or homemade grips, they certainly complement the condition of the revolver.
I have to agree that the original grips are preferable. They have the proper
character and match the rest of the gun. The new grips are beautiful but
look out of character. If they please the owner, that is fine but I suggest
keeping the original grip so that the revolver can be returned to its original
condition (which will sustain its collectability).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
May I ask what is wrong with the grips which were already on the revolver? Are they the ones damaged by water? If they are the original water damaged grips I think it's a mistake to replace them. And if they're grips from another gun or homemade grips, they certainly complement the condition of the revolver.

I'm not trying to take away from the nice job you have done on grip making. Just can't understand why you want to make a new set of grips, then finish them and beat them up to match the condition of the revolver, when that's what you already have on the gun now??

Bottom line, I think the revolver looks cool as is.

John, no they are not the origional grips. as you can see they rough shaped two panels no spacer and glued them to the straps with a rivit to hold them together.
im going to try and replicate the look on the new set. But will keep them with the gun as its part of its history, which I have since the gun was purchased in Italy around 1880s
 

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Hi There,

tony56 said:
John, no they are not the origional grips. as you can see they rough shaped two panels no spacer and glued them to the straps with a rivit to hold them together.
im going to try and replicate the look on the new set. But will keep them with the gun as its part of its history, which I have since the gun was purchased in Italy around 1880s
Well, the grips are not original but they are old replacements
and are part of the revolver's history. And part of collecting
is to preserve a piece of history. Otherwise, it is just a commodity.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
 

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One-Piece Black Walnut Grip Made from Recycled Trapdoor Rifle Stock

About 30 years ago I bought an old Model 1873 Springfield trapdoor rifle that had been used during the Indian Wars. Sadly, the Black Walnut stock on this piece was broken and couldn't be repaired. I removed it from the gun and put it in the back of my bedroom closet. There it remained for the past three decades.


Last year I decided to make a one-piece grip for my early 2nd Generation Colt SAA revolver. Instead of going to Lowes or Home Depot, I chose to use a piece of Black Walnut cut from the old trapdoor rifle stock in my closet. By re-using this wood, I knew I would be touching a piece of American history each time I held my gun. Here is a photo of the grip I made using this wonderful old piece of wood. I encourage others to consider this approach if they decide to make their own grips.

Rusty Edwards

View attachment 458834
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
About 30 years ago I bought an old Model 1873 Springfield trapdoor rifle that had been used during the Indian Wars. Sadly, the Black Walnut stock on this piece was broken and couldn't be repaired. I removed it from the gun and put it in the back of my bedroom closet. There it remained for the past three decades.


Last year I decided to make a one-piece grip for my early 2nd Generation Colt SAA revolver. Instead of going to Lowes or Home Depot, I chose to use a piece of Black Walnut cut from the old trapdoor rifle stock in my closet. By re-using this wood, I knew I would be touching a piece of American history each time I held my gun. Here is a photo of the grip I made using this wonderful old piece of wood. I encourage others to consider this approach if they decide to make their own grips.

Rusty Edwards

View attachment 458834
Nice job rusty, did you use any stain to get the dark colour.
the blank i purchased from Dave, was 130yr old walnut, it it was great to work with.but i never used any colour, just shalac and metho,
 

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I used to strip the shellac off of European walnut grips, which where light in color, and then linseed oil them. Sometimes stain them first. They would always come out darker and better looking.
I think your Colt would look Much better if you stripped all of that shiny shellac off the grips and stain and oil them.
 

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Tony, for your first grip there's nothing wrong with them, good work. People seldom understand the time it takes to make and fit a true, authentic, one piece grip. You should post some photos of the spacer showing the router mark so cherished by the purists. For all the naysayers here, I have had original grips numbered and original to the gun that had no flare, just a straight taper from top to bottom, making them feel a bit thick, and they look like Tony's. The old walnut cannot be replicated with modern, as the wood grew under conifers in shade that gave it tighter grain and color. In addition, the tree this came from, cut in 1872 for a barn build in PA, was over 200 years old, and the grain and color were not affected by the industrial revolution's by products of soot and chemical run off. With wood this good, a pair can be made that CANNOT be distinguished from an original, if you know what and how to do it. Just like restoring a classic car with authentic parts, this is the wood that restores the grip on a classic Colt.

JP
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Tony, for your first grip there's nothing wrong with them, good work. People seldom understand the time it takes to make and fit a true, authentic, one piece grip. You should post some photos of the spacer showing the router mark so cherished by the purists. For all the naysayers here, I have had original grips numbered and original to the gun that had no flare, just a straight taper from top to bottom, making them feel a bit thick, and they look like Tony's. The old walnut cannot be replicated with modern, as the wood grew under conifers in shade that gave it tighter grain and color. In addition, the tree this came from, cut in 1872 for a barn build in PA, was over 200 years old, and the grain and color were not affected by the industrial revolution's by products of soot and chemical run off. With wood this good, a pair can be made that CANNOT be distinguished from an original, if you know what and how to do it. Just like restoring a classic car with authentic parts, this is the wood that restores the grip on a classic Colt.

JP
Hear you go Dave. I have since 0000 steel woolled the grip, and taken the shine off, I am glad now I did not use any stain after reading your comments, about the wood, in fact the grain is indistinguishable, between this grip and my 21761 sa in my signature, and your right about the flare there is none on that grip either, infact ive taken several measurements, and im that close I would not be more then .010'' out over the entire grip.thanks for the compliments also.ive really enjoyed this project, I can only improve on the next one.



 

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