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In December 1992 I had just retired from my first law enforcement job with a small town PD here in Georgia (Bibb City PD). There was no way/no how to make it financially on that small retirement I received and so I started my second LE career as a Deputy Sheriff in Security at a local hospital here in Columbus. I was just thankful for my health and the ability to start working again, especially in this foeld of interest (Law Enforcement). This new job was totally different, in many aspects, from my job as a cop. On my first day of work in December of 1992, I met an elderly gentleman, a Frenchman no less, who was at the tailend of his second career in security at this same hospital. His name was Leo La Pierre, spelled just that way. Leo had formerly served this great nation in the U.S. Army and had finished his military career at Fort Benning, which is next to Columbus. Leo and his family remained in the Columbus area after his retirement and he subsequently went to the Police Academy and upon graduating came to work at the hospital in security as a sworn uniformed deputy. That was almost 20-years prior to me meeting Leo that first day in December 1992. At that time, I was in my mid-40's and had already had 22+years as a cop, but at this new job, I felt lost. It was/is a big health care facility spread out over a large area and, like most hospitals, it is very busy! I started to work on the day shift that first day, tagging along with this very nice Frenchman, Leo, who took me under his wing and proceeded to teach me the ins and outs of hospital security. Very little of my past years as a cop played into this new job. So I wasn't able to fall back on previous experience and Leo was well aware of my short comings. Later in the day, the hectic first one, I noticed that Leo had a Colt Revolver in his duty holster. Having been for many years a Colt man and carrying the Official Police myself that day I mentioned to Leo I noticed he was packing a Colt. His holster had all but the grips covered but I could tell Mark 3 Grips a country mile away. It had been years, then, since I saw a brother officer, other than myself, with a Colt Sixgun! Leo told me that his Colt was the .38 Special Police Model. I asked Leo if he was talking about the Official Police Mark 3 and he said he "thought" it was. I had to clear this up quick. fast, and in a hurry! As soon as we got to a location with some privacy I asked Leo for a look-see at his Colt. He pulled that blue steel Colt out of his duty holster revealing the Official Police Mark 3 with a four-inch barrel with the previously mentioned wood Colt Target Grips. It was a fine-looking Colt with some holster-wear present but otherwise in great shape! Leo asked to see mine and of course I "had" to share its history with Leo who in turn shared the history of his OP. It turned out that Leo had purchased his Colt while he was still in the U.S. Army from a gun store in Columbus around 1972. He had carried this Colt for the duration of his career in security and had never failed to qualify with it at the "mandated" times. From that day Leo and me became friends. I admired Leo's knowledge in hospital security and he had acquired a "deep" amount of security know how over the passing years. For me. he shared that knowledge, without cost or obligation, for which I profited greatly! He carried his Colt until his retirement in 1994.

For the short period of time that Leo and myself worked together before his departure we shared a few laughs in regards to our old Colt .38's. It was during that time period that the local PD and Sheriff's Office were going over to the pistol from the revolver. The issued revolver that was being traded in on new pistols was the very fine stainless Smith & Wesson Model 66. During this period many agencies had already went to the pistol and this change was sweeping the country. Leo and myself were allowed to retain our revolvers through a grandfather clause while everyone else bit the change-over "hook, line, and sinker" as a "needed" change. More firepower needed! Leo and myself would get off together and it was "comedy city" for us! We would hoot, holler, and laugh at some of the "reasons" being given for the "much-needed" pistol! At our private "laugh-ins", Leo and I would say stuff like, "hey, did ya hear what Capt. So & So had to say about the pistol?"
No, what did he say? I mean we were "vicious" in our private sessions and we added a lot of "salt & pepper" to our stories each time we got started up. It was all in good fun though, somewhat! Leo and I qualified one time together before he retired. I was a compeitive shooter and shot frequently then. Leo was not, but would meet me at the range on our days off and practice. Leo was "special" in more ways than one in my career. Not only was he a good friend and mentor, he was the "only" brother officer I ever worked with who (ever) carried the .38 Official Police! In the early 1970's, with the PD, I worked with 4-officers who carried the Python. One of my squad sergeants carried the Lawman MKIII, and two others with the Trooper MK III, and a bushel basket of Detective Specials that plainclothes officers preferred over the S&W Model 36. These were the only Colts, carried by brother officers, in my early years as a cop. As the years went by the Colts, except mine, were replaced by the snubnose S&W Model 66 or the four-inch Model 66 for uniform officers. In 1992, Leo's Colt Official Police MK III, marked the first time I ever worked with a brother who carried, what I called, a "real cops gun", the .38 Official Police! In our short time together, we shared much, laughed much, shot much, and bragged much! The younger officers thought of us as old school and older school, a reference to Leo's age factor. But on the "field of honor", the firing range, Leo and I had a great time with our Colts. We were determined to show the "people-in-the-know" that an old six-shot .38 Special Service Revolver, in trained, practiced hands, was a viable combat handgun! Still relevant then and now! Leo passed away several years ago but our memories together still live on. Leo allowed me the honor of his friendship and the great Colt memories at the firing range. When I get out my Mark 3 Official Police my memories come back in a rush! That four-inch fixed sight .38 retro-cops sixgun, in my friends hand, put some S&W 4586 toters to shame back in 1993. Thanks for the memories Leo!
David
 

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That is a great story.Thank you so much for sharing.It is a little sad to say but I am the solo consistent wheelgun shooter @ my range and the person who I have the fondest memories of wheelgun shooting with was my instructor.He refered to me as "Lefty Junior" and "The Monster that I HAVE CREATED". He instilled in me the importance of shot placement , practice and the belief if you can't handle a situation in 5 or 6 shots and one tactical reload you either A "Need a SWAT TEAM" or B "Shouldn't be carrying a gun." My Semi Autos have there place but 99% of the time it is a wheelgun on my hip.As I have said before if you see a LEO with a wheelgun you know they know how to use it and will hit what they are aiming. Thank you for your service and stay safe.....Mike
 

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I love these kind of stories! Hope they keep coming.
God Bless
Daryl
 

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Thanks for sharing. It necessary every now and then to refresh our memories that a well cared for wheelgun is still a formidable piece of ordinace in trained hands. I just got my "retirement gun" back from Cylinder & Slide; a blue Colt DB 2.5". C&S did a great job on the action and sights, with it and a couple of speedloaders, or speedstrips, I consider myself to be very well armed.
 

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Collect older handguns from Colt and S&W primarily
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Another great story David!
Bill
 

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Speed kills. Eventually the world will tire out and sanity will catch up. This high capacity handgun craze brought on by Mel Gibson and Bruce Willis in the late 80s won't last forever. Revolvers are not outdated, never were and probably never will be. A man with a .38 Special service revolver that knows what he's doing can handle himself just as well as a man with a Glock .40 with a 4 high cap magazines on him
 

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I am always reminded of what my instructor said.He would tell me to look at people shooting thier HI Cap Wondernines and say "What good is all that expended ammo if you don't hit your target". .I have seen that the Hi Cap craze has given shooters a false sense of security and they do not practice anywhere near the frequency they should. I feel more than adequately armed with my D.S. and one tactical reload.....JMHO.....Mike
 

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I have found my semi-autos [Para 1911 & S&W 5906] to be quite enjoyable to shoot, but when the competition is semi-auto vs revolver I will be there with my S&W M66 or M67 or my Colt Metropolitan.
 
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