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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Initially, I wanted to stay silent and act like I still had pride of ownership. It is a hard hit to my self respect to admit that I was bamboozled, but it would be worse if I said nothing. Perhaps someone will put my mistakes to some use.

So, a little while ago I purchased a Colt Python from a local gun shop. To the tune of $2,000. I know some of you are shaking your heads already.

During the transaction he kept stating how wonderful the condition of the gun was. In the low light of the store, that seemed like the truth. It was not.

When I took the gun home, I noticed it rough in some places, so I put it under a strong light. The surface was pitted, and the area around those pits were faded. The seller's comments on using 00 steel wool to clean up rust on the other firearm I had purchased didn't make sense until then. I was more horrified when I took off the grips, and saw the rust all over the internals.

Contrast that to the stellar experience I had with a seller on Gunbroker. The gun was in better condition then the pictures led me to believe, and the seller clearly marked the gun as a shooter. The gun came in quick, and was well packed with care. If he wants to pipe in here, I'd be happy to give him some advertising.

Ultimately, I learned several things when buying used guns:

1) Bring a flashlight, and check for blemishes that might not show up otherwise.
2) Be suspicious of any seller who denigrates other shop owners and their services. He kept stating how awful the handgun classes of other shop owners were.
3) Ask to see under the hood... err, grips.
4) Local gun shop owners are not necessarily more honest than Internet sellers, check around before giving business. I learned of the shop owner's reputation a little too late.
5) The unsolicited mention of steel wool is a bad sign.
6) Make sure you can walk away from a deal if the gun shop owner is too enthusiastic about selling the item. Especially give an hour to cool off if impulse to buy strikes.

I hope this helps someone. It was a painful lesson to learn.



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Thank you for taking the time to post some helpful advice to other forum members. I think all of us at one time or another have been "taken" in one sense or another while buying guns and blades. I know I have been there, done that, and got that T-shirt .
 

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Sorry you got stung. It's like so many other purchases, cars, collectibles or anything else; exercise due diligence in learning beforehand what to look for and what to look out for.

I see, already, you have learned a valuable lesson and thanks for passing it on here!
 

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I feel your pain. It has happened to me, now I always bring my reading glasses lol
 

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You're not alone. I have been dealing with Smith and Wessons for a long time, and have always had a great experience with my purchases (granted this is because I know a bit more about them than Colt Revolvers). I have not had one bad dealing with a Smith purchase. I have had two bad dealings with purchasing Colt Revolvers, with both being misrepresented and generally shady practices (read lack of morals). I do not say this to say bad things about people who deal in Colt's as there are a lot of reputable people who do so, I think this happens because there is, as a rule, a lot more money involved with the snake guns. I am currently following the advise of some very wise forum members, unless it is from a reputable source buy with intent of it being a shooter and if the rest is accurate it is a bonus. I am only currently looking at "shooter grade" revolvers.

I do not consider myself a fool but I have been shown to be less than wise in a couple recent purchases. It is a learning curve that can be quite pricy aparently lol.
 

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..... well.....
Don't beat yourself up too much.
It's still a python, and will reflect your investment in value somewhere down the road.
Some pics would be good.
I have paid the premium for equipment that could be considered to have less value at the time.
You are not alone.
E.g., If I wanted a python and that one was there, I might do likewise.
 

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Thank you for sharing your experience. It's a shame that some are dishonest and misrepresent. I hope you are able to clean up the gun well.
 

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Thank you for sharing your experience, its is a great reminder for us all. By the way you are in good company as there are plenty of people overpaying for Pythons. I live in California and overpay for all my Pythons. Most recently I came to my senses when I was outbid after placing a $3900 bid for a 2.5" Blue Python, and i didn't have anyone sweet talking me. By the way when I started bidding I had decided on a max bid of $2900.....blew right by that Price, Luckily someone was more eager than I was.
 

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Well, how's she shoot? Unless you bought her to be a safe queen, not much sense in beating yourself up too bad. I bought a shooter grade nickel python back in February or March to the toon of $1,000. I felt part the fool back then, but it was literally the only python I had seen for sale in person and all in all it was still in fine shape. Now shooters are going for $1500-1600 on gunbroker. Shoot her in good conscience and enjoy her. In time you can sell her and recoup what you spent. The rusted internals aren't too bad an issue as long as the action is still good. Caveat Emptor and all that, but just enjoy her. If the external damage bothers you too much, take someplace and see what they suggest for refinishing it. I have an army special that was heavily rusted and pitted that I had cerakoted and the pics the place sent me make it look great. Now I am not saying to cerakote a python, but have some fun with the gun, it is still a work of art.
 

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Well no one ever said getting an education is CHEAP.....when I got started I had a "FRIEND" educate me good !!!

I trusted him and believed he was "doing me right"......and boy was he :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Well the laugh is on him.....I kept those guns 20 years and actually made a very small profit :cool: :cool: :cool:

I would say you now have just joined a very big group.....just most never want to admit they are a member ;) ;) ;) RR.
 

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I have been EXTREMELY LUCKY in my gun purchases and have always been pleasantly suprised that the guns were in better condition than I had thought when I bought them. The only exception to this rule was my Instructors off duty and BUG Detective Special. He believed that a gun should be cleaned once a year if at all and he used gasoline as a solvent.Because it was his I could care less.The frame was badly pitted so I had it refinished and bought to factory specs by Colt. I then bought new old stock grips from DBack 13 and it looks great too. Thanks for educationg all of us to be careful.
 

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At GS and LGS I always bring my own bore and flashlite. I even get the seller to let me see the gun outside in natural light. If they balk, I walk. I don't care what kind of gun it is, in the end they'll all like buses,.. miss one and there's another coming. I never complain to a seller if I think i've been cheated, BUT I WILL get even. In one instance it took ten years, but even I got(with interest) and I made him aware of the fact. As stated elsewhere, shady dealings are just good learning experiences. Provided you learn from them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
..... well.....
Don't beat yourself up too much.
It's still a python, and will reflect your investment in value somewhere down the road.
Some pics would be good.
I have paid the premium for equipment that could be considered to have less value at the time.
You are not alone.
E.g., If I wanted a python and that one was there, I might do likewise.



I'll post some clearer pictures of the blemishes later. What is truly sad is that I suspect this gun was near 99% when it was consigned with the dealer.

The condition of the grips show that the previous owner loved and cared for this gun. Besides the places where the dealer went at the gun with steel wool, the blueing looks great. There are no tell-tale marks that the gun was refinished, so I am pretty certain that the blueing is original. The initial condition of the gun is probably what made the pitting so hard to spot.

When I came to the store, the gun was sitting in the open, in the high humidity, instead of in the vault. This makes me suspect that the dealer didn't take care of it like it was a collectable. To him, it was probably just product to sell. I have no doubt that the previous owner only sold it because he or she could not afford to keep it. It was a jewel, now tarnished.

Most of the gun people I have met, however, have been up front and honest. The store owner that gave the handgun class charged $100. There was a range membership fee that was included with the class was $60. We shot 80-100 rounds each, so that must have cost $30-$40 even reloaded, which much of the cartridges were not (22lr). So, he must have been either charged us very close to cost, or even lost money.

Also, the gun smith I visited to ask gun care questions of went out of his way to tell me of the places to shoot and how to keep the gun in good condition.


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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
At GS and LGS I always bring my own bore and flashlite. I even get the seller to let me see the gun outside in natural light. If they balk, I walk. I don't care what kind of gun it is, in the end they'll all like buses,.. miss one and there's another coming. I never complain to a seller if I think i've been cheated, BUT I WILL get even. In one instance it took ten years, but even I got(with interest) and I made him aware of the fact. As stated elsewhere, shady dealings are just good learning experiences. Provided you learn from them.
Very true. The dealer will probably never know how unhappy I am. I certainly wont reveal his name. Fortunately, I don't have to say anything. I learned later that he already has a reputation, a fact that came unsolicited when I mentioned his store.

If I was buying a Glock, I probably would have been alright. Should have increased my wariness with the price of the item.


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2000.00 is a tough lesson. Did you call or go back and talk to them. Did they offer any kind of return option? I know alot of stores don't do that but the one I deal with says any guns purchased and not satisfied with bring it back (within a reasonable time, 1 or 2 days). Ron
 

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Like myself and many others here you just paid the tuition for your education. Instead of letting it getting you down. Take it shooting and enjoy it.
 

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I'll post some clearer pictures of the blemishes later. What is truly sad is that I suspect this gun was near 99% when it was consigned with the dealer.

The condition of the grips show that the previous owner loved and cared for this gun. Besides the places where the dealer went at the gun with steel wool, the blueing looks great. There are no tell-tale marks that the gun was refinished, so I am pretty certain that the blueing is original. The initial condition of the gun is probably what made the pitting so hard to spot.

When I came to the store, the gun was sitting in the open, in the high humidity, instead of in the vault. This makes me suspect that the dealer didn't take care of it like it was a collectable. To him, it was probably just product to sell. I have no doubt that the previous owner only sold it because he or she could not afford to keep it. It was a jewel, now tarnished.

Most of the gun people I have met, however, have been up front and honest. The store owner that gave the handgun class charged $100. There was a range membership fee that was included with the class was $60. We shot 80-100 rounds each, so that must have cost $30-$40 even reloaded, which much of the cartridges were not (22lr). So, he must have been either charged us very close to cost, or even lost money.

Also, the gun smith I visited to ask gun care questions of went out of his way to tell me of the places to shoot and how to keep the gun in good condition.


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In quick defense to the accused a few points:
1) It is a common practice among many people to use 00 steel wool and oil to remove rust, I have had great success with it for removing rust and not removing bluing. Also, I doubt seriously if the gun was well taken care of by the previous owner if it had rust on it. As there would be no reason to take steel wool to a gun that didn't show rust. I find it far more believable that the previous owner let it rust then even the shoddiest pawn shop allowing a gun to rust while trying to sell it. The blemishes look to me like where the rust had already eaten though the bluing, it doesn't have the scratchiness appearance of when you remove blue with steel wool. I have both removed rust and stripped a gun with steel wool, they both have a decidedly different appearance.
2) Why would a gun he was trying to sell be in the vault? Most gun shops vault there nicer items each night, but few have a safe capable of holding their entire inventory.
3) Also on the subject of the rust/pitting-Such damage takes time, it isn't going to occur from sitting out in the open air for a few months at a gun shop, especially considering I would expect them to wipe down their guns from customer handling. Again, I think he bought it rusted and pitted.
4) The condition of the grips can also mean that the previous owner put some nicer condition grips on them when he sold it to try to get a better price or that he didn't like wood grips and therefore didn't carry the gun with the wood on it.
5) Lastly, by your own words the GSO mentioned the fact that he used steel wool on the gun to remove rust, so it wasn't like he hid it. Bad lighting in gun stores is not anything new, but he did tell you he used steel wool on the gun.

Now, not defending the man and I definitely wasn't there, so if you say he was shady, then he definitely was, but those were just some of the things that stuck out at me in your above post.

Again was this a safe queen or a shooter? If you are planning to shoot it, you didn't do that badly. Give it another year and shooter pythons will be over $2k at the rate we are going.
 
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