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I finally found one of these at a semi-decent price. Probably because of this import mark:



Doesn't bother me a bit.

I love the sturdy utilitarian look of the thing:



In researching this, I found two phrases that come up in every single discussion: "wandering zero" and "kicks like a mule".

I think the first is a myth, largely brought on by the second. It comes with this recoil enhancer:



A look at the other side and the markings:





I'll probably try to see if there is some wood under the grime. Other than that it will stay as is.



Anyone else got one?
 

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Those recoil pads on these are usually as hard as the wood. I picked mine up just last year, but can't attest to the accuracy, as I think I sold all my .303 ammo when I sold my other Enfields years back. Might have a few boxes somewhere. Have to look I guess.
 

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These rifles have always fascinated me. They just have a look about them that is special. I have heard that accuracy may not be the best. So what. One very cool rifle. Enjoy.
 

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Homerfan,

I have one of these and it is so ugly it is cute, LOL! Mine is not import marked and all original parts. About 6 years ago, I was working in Louisiana near the Texas line. I went to a very small gunshop and saw an odd looking rifle. Took a look and sure enough, a Mk 5; it was nice.....except someone had painted the stock with a brick red paint. It was a great paint job and very well done. From what I saw, it was all original except the paint. I asked the owner the price and he said it was on consignment from a fellow who painted it for his son to shoot alligators with. I thought to myself; I sure would hate to be in a small boat and fire this "beast of recoil"! This would have knocked a small person out of the boat. This is probably why it was for sale. Anyway, I finally made a deal for the carbine at $325. The first thing I did was take it apart, all was clean, bore like new, made in 1945, and from all appearances, not having been fired much. I took the wood to an antique restoration expert, got the paint removed, lightly steel wooled the wood to smooth out the raised grain, and put a number of coates of BLO and she now looks like she just came from the factory.

As to the "wandering zero", the British did have some problems with this and never 100% solved it or why it happened, but issued them anyway. I am not recoil sensative, but they do have a respectable kick to them. The rubber buttpad feels more like a steel than rubber, LOL! I like mine and plan on keeping this one a long time.

You will like yours too, it just has that "cool look" to it, and is accurate enought for deer hunting too!
 

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I never really figured out the recoil part of this, the 303 is not a hard recoiling round I have a mk 4 and its very acc. I know the mk5 wasnt know for being accurate but the recoil is not that bad. Shoot some 3.5 turkey rounds then shoot the 303 it wont seem nearly as bad. Love those old brit guns, nice piece:)
 

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"I never really figured out the recoil part of this, the 303 is not a hard recoiling round I have a mk 4 and its very acc."

The recoil in concentrated on the smaller area of the rubber recoil pad.

A college buddy had one and even when I was young, I thought it kicked.

I picked up one of the .308 Indian jungle carbines a few years ago. 12 rounds in the mag and the wider, standard buttplate reduces the felt recoil a lot.

A one time, replacement recoil pads, with internal give, were available for the Brit carbines.
 

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I've always had a yearning for the MK5 and did the "reverse collectors" thing, bought the bayonet and hunted for the rifle afterwards. Could never find a good, clean example at a fair price however, so still holding that bayonet and looking.
I understand these bayonets are fairly hard to come by now. There was always something alluring about these guns.
By the way did the same thing with a Jap Nambu clamshell holster, hunted for a clean Nambu, then traded the whole rig for a nickel Triplelock with pearls in a flash.
 

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The recoil pad is currently being reproduced, and it makes a difference when they're new.

The 'wandering zero' came about because of two things - the 'lightening cuts' made to the receiver when they were making these as light as possible, and from prolonged firing that could cause 'warping' of the receiver during rapid Fire.

Shoot slowly, and it doesn't happen.

The Brits almost made this their primary Service rifle - it did well in Malaysia - but then the Trials of the FN/FAL led to the adoption of the L1A1.

In trying to reduce the warping, they tried some MkIV receivers, and their heavier construction seemed to solve the problem at the cost of additional weight - so they scrapped that idea.

One has to remember that this fired a full-length, full-power service rifle load - 'not' a lesser carbine equivalent - they got hot 'fast' and they recoiled robustly.

There are a lot of fakes in the British Military Rifle arena - the Jungle Carbines were faked most of all - so get a copy of one of Ian Skennerton's works, and review it (one of mine's featured - it was a 'Test Rifle' with an aluminum flash hider).
 

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I had one as a teen back when I was still tough ;)

No wandering zero on mine but man it was a bruiser . As a shooter , I much preferred my Smith Corona 03-A3 I also owned at that time . She was a sweetheart .
 

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One of my all time favorite firearms. Over the years I've owned at least 4 of them, and wish I'd kept the last one, which was in new, unissued condition, but had a short "S" marked stock.
When I found it in a gun shop even the original finish on the bolt was un-worn and new.

One writer said the Jungle Carbine "looked dashing", which it does. One of the most unique of all bolt rifles.
Years ago when they were cheap and plentiful they were popular as a deer rifle. The large aperture rear sight and flash hider worked very well in the dim overcast light in the woods, just like they had worked in the jungle.

But Oh, how that hard rubber butt pad hurt.
 

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A friend bought one back in the 60's for less than 50 bucks at Sears & Roebuck.
 
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