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Found in my "junk draw". Anyone know anything about it? Any value at all? There are no other markings. Just a good ole leather holster. Thanks in advance

ch2.jpg ch3.jpg ch1.jpg
 

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Built by Wally Wolfram - clean it and enjoy it - they were good holsters.
What dogface left out is that these Colts by Wolfram were made early 1960s. Wolfram was sold more than once thereafter to become Smith & Wesson Leathergoods in the late 1960s that in turn became Gould & Goodrich; and for reasons that are not clear to me, Tex Shoemaker who started up his fulltime operation in the late 1960s made his identically -- right down to the numbering system and the curious sewing of the belt loop's tip end.
 

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The number 1 stamped at the sewn end of the belt loop is the size code for a 2” or 3” Detective Special, there is a letter as well that is probably an S indicating safety strap.
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turnerriver
 

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The number 1 stamped at the sewn end of the belt loop is the size code for a 2” or 3” Detective Special, there is a letter as well that is probably an S indicating safety strap.
Regards,
turnerriver
Well yes; and no. You don't know how sorry I am that I know this but: The Number 1 is the version with the hammer guard for the 2" or 3" Colt DS; the Number 1S has no hammer guard but has the safety strap and for the same revolver. So to a maker, not the same holster with a strap added; instead entirely different holsters one of which has a safety strap. Wally used the number to indicate 'fitment' which then led him to some awkward numbers and letters when he wanted to add a similar model, or another size, when all the low numbers had already been assigned :).

To confuse matters he also used letters to indicate who made it; so Colt holsters with the 'W' abound and there are other letters I haven't bothered to decipher. My friend Buckspen might actually know :).
 

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Recent sales on an online auction site have ranged from $15-80 with most being in the $30-50 range.
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turnerriver
 

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The first holsters that were Colt "branded" had model numbers beginning in "C". I don't know who actually made these, but it's possible it was Jay-Pee (some of the holsters of each brand are VERY similar). They were first offered by Colt about 1957. Next were the "W" holsters made by Wally Wolfram about 1960. Colt dropped the "W" marking after a while. The H-1 Fast Draw Special holster and belt rig for the Frontier Scout (about 1964) was made by Hunter Leather (comparisons show them to be identical except for the markings.) The "O-1" holster and belt rigs (early 1960's) were stamped with the logo in the accompanying photo which implies that they were made, or at least designed, by Arvo Ojala. While they look very similar to Ojala holsters, some things that Red Nichols has mentioned in our conversations lead me to believe that they might not actually have been made in his shop. If not, I don't know who might have actually manufactured them. In 1970, Colt introduced a new line of holsters with model numbers starting with "H". Again, I don't know who actually produced these holsters, but they look quite similar to those from Bucheimer. If you take an in-depth look at Colt's firearms model numbers and publication numbers, you will realize that they were quite inconsistent and seem sometimes to have plucked numbers and letters out of thin air. But it's fun, and sometimes frustrating, to those of us who like to research these things.
- Buckspen
ojala22a.JPG
 

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The first holsters that were Colt "branded" had model numbers beginning in "C". I don't know who actually made these, but it's possible it was Jay-Pee (some of the holsters of each brand are VERY similar). They were first offered by Colt about 1957. Next were the "W" holsters made by Wally Wolfram about 1960. Colt dropped the "W" marking after a while. The H-1 Fast Draw Special holster and belt rig for the Frontier Scout (about 1964) was made by Hunter Leather (comparisons show them to be identical except for the markings.) The "O-1" holster and belt rigs (early 1960's) were stamped with the logo in the accompanying photo which implies that they were made, or at least designed, by Arvo Ojala. While they look very similar to Ojala holsters, some things that Red Nichols has mentioned in our conversations lead me to believe that they might not actually have been made in his shop. If not, I don't know who might have actually manufactured them. In 1970, Colt introduced a new line of holsters with model numbers starting with "H". Again, I don't know who actually produced these holsters, but they look quite similar to those from Bucheimer. If you take an in-depth look at Colt's firearms model numbers and publication numbers, you will realize that they were quite inconsistent and seem sometimes to have plucked numbers and letters out of thin air. But it's fun, and sometimes frustrating, to those of us who like to research these things.
- Buckspen
View attachment 667133
Very good, most all of what I know about Colt gunleather I learned from Buckspen :). It does seem that the C, which originally would 'obviously' be for Colt, is for Courtlandt Boot Jack, which company evolved from Audley to Folsom to Courtlandt and then on to JayPee (J.P. was for John Parlante, whose scion started up Cobra gunleather in the '70s). I do have JayPees in my image collection that are very much the Colt holsters but with the JayPee mark on them; and this image from a Colt catalog is a Courtlandt (of course we all know what a 'boot jack' is):

1957 h1000 may be Courtlandts (1).jpg audley (4).jpg

I look at Colt's, then S&W's, entries into the gunleather market as less an opportunistic act to make a buck, and more a validation of my view that handguns are missing, from day one, an essential component: a way to carry them on the person because they can't literally be carried in the hand 24/7. Then notice also the retainer clip of the CBJ; even today NO pistols are actually designed and made with a purpose-built component to keep them in the holster; instead the pistol makers simply ignored it and dumb-bunnies like the Safariland folk stepped in with 'security' holsters and said 'we volunteer to be the ones who are sued when a gun is taken away from an officer'. I've even testified on behalf of some of these various holster companies: Bianchi, DeSantis, Hume, G&G, more.

"Then they came and took all the safeties off" -- which is why I don't build gunleather for Glocks et al. SOMEBODY was asleep at the switch when they let sewing machine inventor Gaston Glock take over the handgun market :).
 
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