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This holster came from a St. Paul, MN cop who wore it in the 50's - 60's. His gun was a 6-in. Colt Officers model who's s/n puts it at 1950. The only ledigible embossing on the back of the holster is "Arlington, Calif", and "38" and "6".

Just want to learn about this rig.

Thanks,
 

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This may or may not be of any help Bob, but I have one similar. It's a Hunter for a 4" N frame without a safety strap. The Hunter marking is the familiar powder horn marking with Hunter inside the powder horn. There are #s below the name 33 26 54L.
I don't recall where I got it or how long I've had it, but it's a very useful holster. You can tighten down the tension screw till you almost can't get the gun out. I am not picture litterate or I'd show a picture of it. Mine is black too.
Hope this helps some?
Frank
 

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If I am not mistaken that rig was probably a "cross draw" set up. Back in the day "cross draw" was a common way to carry for law enforcement. Back in the early 80s when I went from patrol to the Det division we were issued holsters that looked just like yours for our 4 inch Smiths. They were "cross draws" and the entire division wore them. I might still have mine in the basement. I will look to see , and try to get a name for you.
 

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Probably Bucheimer-Clark.
Historical information: "Bucheimer-Clark started as the Clark Holster Company of California. They made the Shoulder Holster for a variety of revolvers (No semi-Autos) in barrel lengths up to 5” ONLY. Bucheimer-Clark was acquired as a division of J.M. Buchheimer, a company that had been around since the 1880s. The holsters were use in other films in the sixties. And the holster was used by LAPD cops and California private eyes for years.

J.M. Bucheimer in a detailed contract agreement in the late seventies (and later was awarded full rights to the dies as well as acquired the patterns and rights to the Old Clark Holster Co. of Los Angeles); and, Ed Clark, son of the Clark Company Founder. Ed was in his fifties back then and had been making holsters since the forties when he was a kid."

Here are some old photos taken from my archives of Los Angeles Sheriff's Department.



 

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Hey, not quite sure where to post this but this thread looks like it will fit. An officer in my home town carries his S&W 1911 with Surefire light in a holster that has the rotating hood retention but it IS NOT a safariland. he said its "goko" or maybe its "goco." its not galco, i have checked. If anyone can help me as to the correct spelling and maybe a site link for them, it would be much appreciated. Thanks.
 

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I have one of those Bucheimer for a four inch in the back of my closet. In the '70s I used it when working in plain clothes as I only had a four inch Colt or Smith and Wesson, we traded revolvers so much back then we all had four inchers and they all seemed to fit in the same holster. The tension screw made them very secure. They were a popular type of holster back then. Some of the older guys wore them on their duty belts. They were comfortable when driving. Most of the time I wore a border patrol style.

Daryl
 
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