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Discussion Starter #1
This is going to be one (or two) of those questions that bugs some people (me included) but I'm stuck.

A very long-time friend is selling a couple of guns and offered me first shot at them. One is a Navy Arms 5" Schofield in 44-40. That one I can find info about.
The second gun is a nickel Smith & Wesson top break. He sent this picture and said it had "38 CTG" on the left side of the barrel. I handled the gun a few years back and remember it being tight and timed well. The nickel looked really good.
1. What is it?
2. What is a fair price for both of us?

705399
 

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S&W Double Action 3rd or 4th Model Revolver. Not excellent, but good condition. A lot of minty guns out there and few collectors. People seem to have kept them in a dresser drawer. In .38 S&W made 1884 - 1909. My opinion is $350. The Navy Arms, another story. I had one of the first (I still the have box and custom grips) and had a hard time selling it in .44-40. People wanted it in the original caliber of .45 Schofield. Indeed, that is why I sold it. Whatever the blue book value is, take .25 to .30 percent off.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I appreciate the info. I have no idea what he has in mind on either one.
As far as the Navy Arms gun, I have the Uberti version in 45 Colt...but I also like 44-40.
I don't need the Smith but I don't have one either...

Is there such a thing as too many guns?
 

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The older small caliber break-tops make people think of lesser quality guns from the period. The Smith and Wesson’s were very well made, as you might expect, and could do the job today as well as in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Now that I know what it is, I now don't doubt it has been refinished. The markings are sharp and clear, if memory serves, but I'm finding that the hammer and trigger should be case-hardened and the latch and trigger guard should be blued.
 

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NRA “Good Condition” for antique firearms includes refinished guns.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It likely started in blue and was plated later on.
That is entirely possible. I will get a closer look at it later this week and hopefully some better pictures.
We'll see what happens.
 

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Is there such a thing as too many guns?
Other than 38 means 38 S&W, I do know this one: Can you have too many heartbeats? Take too many breaths?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As it turns out, he gave me the gun and a holster in exchange for working on his 1911.

Now...does any have instructions or details on disassembly of a Model 3 or Model 4 DA 38 S&W?

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If you have a copy of Chicoine's 'Gunsmithing guns of the old west" it has a chapter on these.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I don't have a copy but do have #1 son with an Amazon Prime and an Ebay account and the search skills. We'll see what happens.
 

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Taking lots of detailed pics with your phone helps greatly with disassembly.
Because of my phone....I can easily disassemble every part but the barrel in Anacondas and S&W 1899; and the Vest Pocket.
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This is just a few pics of many taken from my 1899 disassembly for a cleaning it hasn’t had in over 100 years.

Its amazing to me that the internal parts like these were made and mass produced in 1900. It amazes me how every part has a purpose and the pistol will not function if any part is broken or missing. No internal part can be any bigger or smaller or a different shape. I don’t see how this set up will operate properly if anything is changed.
 

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Disassembling your revolver is not very difficult but requires a minimum of thoroughness and understanding of how it works. If you are used to working with old guns and feel confident, you can do it with just a few simple tools.

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Biff, thanks for the pics! Not often I get to see the guts of a pre-rebound slide S&W HE.

Not ashamed to admit YouTube videos have saved my bacon in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you have a copy of Chicoine's 'Gunsmithing guns of the old west" it has a chapter on these.
I found a copy of the book. In fact I found several with prices ranging from $60 to $250. Mine is supposed to show up Monday.
Hope it has disassembly instructions. The bolt does not pop up to lock the cylinder. I'm thinking there is a broken or missing spring in there somewhere.
 

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I found a copy of the book. In fact I found several with prices ranging from $60 to $250. Mine is supposed to show up Monday.
Hope it has disassembly instructions. The bolt does not pop up to lock the cylinder. I'm thinking there is a broken or missing spring in there somewhere.
The bolt - cylinder lock - is a spring itself (like the trigger guard).
It is held in the frame by a small pin and actuated by the rear sear. The balance is very delicate. Maybe some old, hard grease is enough to block it. A simple cleanning with penetrating oil may also help.
That part should not break until it has been disassembled and handled by a novice gunsmith who has forced to reassemble the revolver without respecting the planned sequence.
When reassembling, all the parts must be inserted effortlessly, manipulating the trigger to place them correctly. It is much more complicated than taking it apart, and it is often here that parts are dammaged.

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706803

 

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Discussion Starter #19
That part should not break until it has been disassembled and handled by a novice gunsmith who has forced to reassemble the revolver without respecting the planned sequence.
When reassembling, all the parts must be inserted effortlessly, manipulating the trigger to place them correctly. It is much more complicated than taking it apart, and it is often here that parts are dammaged.

This ⬆ ⬆ ⬆ is why I am hoping there are detailed instructions in the book. Removing screws and tapping out pins is not a problem but I've never messed with a top-break S&W before. I hate to just dive in and wind up with a hand-full of parts wondering what went where and how it got there.
I appreciate the link. Hopefully nothing is lost or broken as it appears most of the parts are "out of stock."
 

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May be you don't need to disassemble evrything for your problem of the bolt not catching the cylinder.
First you should open the plate (remove the grips, then the nut fron the hammer stud and knock on the frame with a wooden tool)
and look how the sear engage the SA notches of the hammer when cocking it.
This is the leg of the sear which pushes down on the bolt when it engages the hammer at the rest position.
Just watching how they move together can reveal where the problem is.
The hammer can be removed and reinstalled by holding the trigger fully depressed (after removing the mainspring of course).
By the way, does the hammer lock correctly at full cocking (SA mode) ?

A few detailed pictures of your gun could help too.
 
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