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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I sent my new Cobra back to Colt, because the bolt was dropping well before it was near the lead to the bolt stop. I received the repair letter from Colt today, which states:

"Bolt is designed like a King Cobra or Anaconda. Bolt drops before lead. Drag line will be present."

Can any of you snake owners tell me if this is true, or am I being fed BS? Thanks.
 

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I know you and I have spoken real time about it Tim, but for the Forum , my first new Cobra is timed where the bolt drops in the lead. My second Cobra, the bolt drops just after clearing the previous notch.. well before the lead. A whole lot of variation between two guns. I would certainly prefer the bolt to drop in the lead.
 

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I would rephrase Colt's statement as "bolt can drop before the lead". The Mk III action is very robust, but it's not exactly a precision product. As a matter of fact, it was designed to require less precision in the manufacturing process. You can probably change the bolt drop by trying other trigger/bolt combinations, but I doubt that these parts were tuned and matched from the factory. Some have said that the parts were supposed to be made for a "drop in" installation, and any any factory tuning was done by simply swapping parts until it worked.

In any case: As long as the lockup works you're in good shape. It's not the old Cobra, it's the new Cobra.
 

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One would think in Hopalongs case where Colt has spent the money to pay for the shipping and all that entails to receive a gun back, I鈥檇 go ahead and swap out the parts to get the gun where the bolt drops in the leads. To me, that shows small thinking to have gone this far and end with an unsatisfied customer. They know why he sent it back. Why make a customer go through all that to return it and then not fix what almost any of us could fix with parts to swap. A happy customer is almost never a bad result. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One would think in Hopalongs case where Colt has spent the money to pay for the shipping and all that entails to receive a gun back, I鈥檇 go ahead and swap out the parts to get the gun where the bolt drops in the leads. To me, that shows small thinking to have gone this far and end with an unsatisfied customer. They know why he sent it back. Why make a customer go through all that to return it and then not fix what almost any of us could fix with parts to swap. A happy customer is almost never a bad result. :)
Ben, you know that, and I know that. Colt? I'm not so sure they get it these days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
At the very least, Colt should explain the issue to their Customer Service reps. I explained the issue over the phone. It would have been so much easier for the rep to have said that's normal. It would have saved a lot of unecessary time and shipping.
 

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One would think in Hopalongs case where Colt has spent the money to pay for the shipping and all that entails to receive a gun back, I鈥檇 go ahead and swap out the parts to get the gun where the bolt drops in the leads. To me, that shows small thinking to have gone this far and end with an unsatisfied customer. They know why he sent it back. Why make a customer go through all that to return it and then not fix what almost any of us could fix with parts to swap. A happy customer is almost never a bad result. :)
The more I hear about Colt's "customer service" (note quotation marks), the less I want a new Colt. There was somebody else here who was overjoyed with Colt's outstanding service because they fixed a timing problem in his new gun, but in my mind it should never even have left the factory with a timing problem.

There's bad apples from every manufacturer, but it seems like there's been a lot from Colt lately and what we hear about on the forum is probably just a fraction of it. There's a lot of first time Colt owners buying the Cobra and a first impression can last for a very long time, so they need to do much better than that if they want to get into the revolver market again. Just as an example: I bought a brand new Taurus about 20 years ago, and the cylinder jammed shut after about 20 rounds. I did get it fixed, but I sold the gun immediately and swore that I would never buy a Taurus again. No matter how good their warranty is, no matter how good people say their quality is nowadays, I simply will not buy one. That was my first and last Taurus, period. This is what a first impression does to you, and that's what Colt needs to think about.
 

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At the very least, Colt should explain the issue to their Customer Service reps. I explained the issue over the phone. It would have been so much easier for the rep to have said that's normal. It would have saved a lot of unecessary time and shipping.
I thought the same thing, Tim.. but I kinda went long on my response already.
The only new product they鈥檝e had - why wouldn鈥檛 customer service know that by now. Makes me wonder if a different somebody had worked on the gun, would they have just fixed it and sent it back? Who knows.
 

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Assuming you have a new stainless Cobra, they do work like the Mark III and later Colt transfer bar action models.
The bolt is designed to ride the cylinder for much or most of the rotation.

The last of them before the new Cobra was the Colt "SF" framed SF-VI, DS-II, and Magnum Carry.
On these models the bolt dropped so soon I was concerned that if the action wore a little the bolt would drop right back into the locking notch before the cylinder could rotate.
On the early SF-VI I owned the bolt actually dropped nearly on the trailing edge of the locking notch. It still functioned, but the bolt rode the cylinder for virtually the entire rotation of the cylinder.

On these models, if the action were to be timed to drop the bolt into the leade of the locking notch like the old "D" frame models, it would be near impossible for the gun NOT to by-pass the locking notch and have throw-by.
Due to the design of these later Colt transfer bar actions they have much shorter leades in front of the locking notch, unlike the older Colt with the long leades.
 

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Good point but... in Ben's case with 2 identical revolvers, one bolt
drops in the lead and the other drops just after clearing the previous notch. Something's not right here... Where's the consistency and quality control here?
 

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Good point but... in Ben's case with 2 identical revolvers, one bolt
drops in the lead and the other drops just after clearing the previous notch. Something's not right here... Where's the consistency and quality control here?
Probably "New Model syndrome"
With many new products, including guns there's often an early period where things fluctuate, before settling down.
That's one reason many people won't buy a totally new model of gun until production has settled down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate everyone's responses, especially some PMs from A1A. I've decided not to worry about it.

I also asked Colt to check the clearance between the cylinder and the frame. The space between the two with the cylinder open is practically nonexistent. I spoke with them two days ago, and the gun should be on its way back right after the holidays.
 
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