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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Woo Hoooo!!!

I'm happy! Just clinched the deal. Here's my new Colt .357:







The only thing wrong with this is the screw directly above the left grip behind the colt logo is not blue. Not sure what that's about. Could be from the factory. Otherwise, this baby is a cherry.

Look at the pictures and weep gentlemen.
 

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I always keep an eye out for this model. It's one of fav's, expecially in nickel. Congrats and enjoy
 

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I suspect you're rear plate screw is either a replacement or one that was repaired and never re-blued.

On Colt's, guns with Service grips used rounded-headed screws, shaped the same way as the front plate screw.

Guns with Target stocks had flat-headed screws to allow the Target grips to lay flat against the side plate.

So, you're first move is to determine whether the screw is stainless steel, nickel, or just a standard screw someone removed the bluing from.

In the future, kindly desist from posting pictures of 4" 357's. /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

That's the one Colt I always wanted and never could find.
Now there are plenty for sale on the internet, and as a retiree, I have no money. /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
[ QUOTE ]
So, you're first move is to determine whether the screw is stainless steel, nickel, or just a standard screw someone removed the bluing from.

[/ QUOTE ]

I will certainly check this out as soon as I receive it. I would think a blued round head screw for this should not be too hard to find and replace. I am wondering why the screw would have been removed in the first place since the gun obviously was not used much, and the seller says it appears to be unfired. Could it possibly have had a trigger job?

[ QUOTE ]
In the future, kindly desist from posting pictures of 4" 357's. /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

That's the one Colt I always wanted and never could find.
Now there are plenty for sale on the internet, and as a retiree, I have no money. /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

I feel your pain. I see them on the internet also, but not many in this fine condition. I stuck my neck out and will probably be eating nothing but franks and beans for the next month. I had to have it. It is my first birth year gun, 1960.
 

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"I am wondering why the screw would have been removed in the first place".

One reason for a flat screw is, "usually" (NOT always) a 357 fitted with the target hammer would also be fitted with target grips, in which case it would have a flat-head rear plate screw.

It's always been very popular when selling a Colt to rob the target grips and replace them with service grips, or whatever after market comes to hand.

So, it's possible your 357's grips may have been target models that were switched prior to it's sale.

This still doesn't explain the bright finish.

Bottom line: Who knows????

In this case, what's important is, you have a like new Colt 4" 357......and I don't.

To quote my 92 year-old Mother, "I wish I had the gun and you had a feather up your ass. Then we'd both be tickled".
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Were the full checkered target stocks on the .357 model identical to those that were used on the early Pythons?
 

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Yes, except the earliest ones on the guns other than the Python were often made of a very dark stained hardwood, with a flat oil finish.

These are a uniform very dark brown with no grain showing.
Under the stain, the wood is a fairly soft yellowish wood.

By the time of your 1960 model, the fully checkered grips had been replaced by the Second type Target grips with the "thumb rest" on the left grip, and the checkering ending in a semi-circle under the medallions.

Second Type Colt Target grips:




On these grips, the early versions made for the Trooper were the yellowish hardwood, but had a lighter walnut stain and a thin coat of varnish.

I would suspect that by the late 50's the 357 would have had real walnut grips, with silver medallions.
 

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DFW and I disagree that Colt ever put anything but walnut wood on its wood-stocked revolvers.

The catalogs of the "357" era all say walnut is the stock material for every Colt revolver. I also have a press release packet for the introduction of the "357" that says walnut is the stock material. My early "357" revolvers have walnut stocks.

Beautiful gun! Now you need a box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to both for all the info. I'm kinda glad to hear I need the second type target stock. They should be a little easier to find.
 

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Manderson:

1)Congratulations on finding a beautiful Colt .357!

2)Following are some pictures of my Colt .357 also made in the year 1960. The grips are original to the gun and look new!:



 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Colt38, much appreciated. Beautiful pistol. I am especially glad to know the service stocks are definitely original from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just purchased a like new original Colt blued, round head screw from Jack First to make this perfect.

Now here's a question: I never use anything but cleaning tools on my guns. Do I need to be careful replacing this? As long as nothing will pop out at me, I figure to just use a thin piece of cotton in between the screw driver and the new screw so I don't scratch it up.

I hate to admit my stupidity, but a long time ago I took a High Standard Trophy apart just for fun and lost a little spring that popped out.

I don't take guns apart anymore except the stocks occasionally for cleaning.
 

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To just swap out those 2 screws all you need is the correct fitting gunsmith screwdriver. Normal flathead screwdrivers have a tapered blade and don't fit very well. The right gunsmith screwdriver's blade will fit the slot of the screw and not scratch it.
Don't worry as nothing will pop out or drop off when you remove the screw.
 

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manderson, I do not believe you can cite the Colt38 "357" pictured as a standard for originality for any feature. The coarse engraving and glossy black finish does not look factory to me (compare the finish to the first "357" pictured), and, if the box shown is supposed to be "original" to the "357" pictured, it cannot be since is is about 30 years too new in style. The stocks may be original to the gun because such service stocks were standard on the "357." Target stocks of whatever style was being used at the time a particular "357" was manufactured were optional.
 

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manderson,

You got yourself a beautiful piece!

Oh, I understand Colt hand wrote the s/n on the bottom of the boxes as standard practice back in the day.

The box you're looking at looks factory original to me.
 
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