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Discussion Starter #1
First off, I'd like to say hello and thank you. I've learned a lot reading here in the last few weeks.
I recently purchased a 1970's vintage Police Positive Special (heavy barrel, shrouded, half underlug), which aside from a pea sized gouge in the grips is essentially in mint condition. It shows very little sign of having been fired much if at all. It's my first Colt.
I've since discovered two potential problems and was hoping to get some opinions.
I've performed the timing check outlined here by dfariswheel(thanks for that). The bolt pops into the lead at about the 2/3 mark, which is perhaps a bit late. What concerns me more is that the bolt doesn't fall into the notch until the hammer reaches full cock. No matter how slow I bring back the hammer and watch, I can't get the bolt to fall before full cock. Thankfully, neither can I bring the hammer to full cock without the bolt locking into the notch. It really seems to be an exact dead heat. Neither happens without the other. Is this acceptable timing or the beginning of a problem which is only going to get worse? I haven't live fired the gun yet.
The second problem involves a loose rebound lever pin. Everything is fine with the factory wood grip, which snugs flush to the frame, but I installed a Hogue and the groove inside allows the pin to work free enough to disengage from one side with predictable results. Is there any way of securely anchoring the pin which will not affect the function of the rebound lever? Loctite? A small amount of solder perhaps? Or should I just resign myself to not using the Hogues (they feel really good).
Any opinions or suggestions on either matter will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Your timing is on the edge of being a little late, but acceptable.
What's important is, that the hammer won't cock without the bolt locking up too.

What's probably happened is, the revolver was timed JUST a little too close at the factory, and the parts have "seated".

Keep an eye on it, and if it starts to fail to lock, you'll need to have a simple repair done. This is usually nothing more than to have a Colt-qualified 'smith stretch the hand slightly.

Be aware, don't trust anybody but a true Colt qualified 'smith. The hand isn't stretched in a manner most people thing it should, and it's easy to ruin it.

In truth, this failure to lock, slightly out of time condition is acceptable for a shooter, AS LONG as it doesn't get too bad.

The loose pin can be lightly staked in place.
To do this, put the frame on a brass block, with the pin resting on the block.
If you don't have brass, put a piece of ordinary paper over a steel block to prevent scratching the frame.

With the pin supported by the block, use a center punch to lightly punch the center of the pin.
This will slightly upset the end of the pin.
Repeat on the other side of the pin, and test for tightness.

You can do this with an automatic center punch, but lower the striking force of the punch so you don't over-punch the pin.
It doesn't take much to tighten it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you very much, especially for the quick response. I've learned quite a bit from your posts in particular. I guess I'll be able to take it out and shoot it this weekend with a good degree of confidence that everything is OK. I appreciate it.
 
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