Colt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Now what to do with this fine piece of history! Save it, sell it, shoot it?


Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk 2
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I know, so many people are horrified that I plan to carry and shoot a gun that is NIB and unfired. But it has the tiniest little ding (from the factory) on the top strap that allowed me to get if for much less than the asking price. And I don't like buying guns to collect (dust) them anyway. Sure, I could sell it for more than I paid, but there's just something about being the first person to shoot a gun that was built back when I was only 4 years old! I'll let you know how it goes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
"Choot it Lizabeth":)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Methos1979

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Why pay for a NIB if you're going to shoot it? Buy a less pristine and less expensive revolver that has good mechanics but normal wear for shooting.

Not that I don't appreciate you increasing the value of all the remaining examples...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,827 Posts
Whenever I get a gun like that I end up selling it. I can not get myself to shoot it. It is like buying a nice collector car, parking it in the garage, and never starting it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Why pay for a NIB if you're going to shoot it? Buy a less pristine and less expensive revolver that has good mechanics but normal wear for shooting.

Not that I don't appreciate you increasing the value of all the remaining examples...
Because I can, and you're welcome!

Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk 2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
30-35 years ago I acquired a 6" Python from an old man in his late 80s . He also sold me a 1917 Colt with holster that was pristine[both gun and holster]. He confided that he had "requisitioned " the 1917 in France and brought it home. I don't believe the gun had ever been fired outside of the factory.Anyway, that is another story. The Python had apparently been fired 6 rounds outside of the factory. I had carried a 4" Python through 21 months in Viet Nam because I couldn't find a 6" in Oakland, CA before my troop ship sailed. I REALLY wanted a 6".The old gentleman said he was about " to run out his string" and had no one to leave his guns to but, every one at the gun show was trying to rob him. I offered him a good price and got both at what I considered a very good price but still good for me.[Actually,I gave him a healthy price for the Python and he nearly gave me the 1917 because he really wanted someone to appreciate his Python and treat him with respect]. He told me he had gotten the first Python to come into the Colt distributor in Alabama but when he got it home he noticed the rib was "wavy". So he sent it to Colt for repair. He said the gun he got back was not the one he sent.The one I bought was serial #447!!! I bring this up because I kept the gun for nearly 20 years and could not bring myself to shoot such a pristine piece. I sold it to a collector in 1984 for the princely sum of,IIRC,$995.00! Why do I post this here? Well my friends, the money gave me a little pleasure, but nowhere near what I would have enjoyed shooting and owning it all these years! I appreciate collectors who keep pristine gun to show the rest of us what it was like leaving the factory, BUT, I kick my butt every time I think of selling that gun.Make your decision before you buy. To own a safe queen for posterity, or to own a shooting piece of plunder.Shoot it take care of it, don't abuse or ignore it, and cherish not only the gun but the wonderful times it provided you between the "cradle and the grave". You can't be buried with and it's next caretaker may sell it for dope money. BTW: I STILL have my 4" and will never part with it in this life, we owe each other our longevity.[she ain't sitting on a mantle in Northern Viet Nam, and neither am I!] Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,466 Posts
If I could like your post twice I would. I appreciate everyone's difference of opinion on whether to shoot a pristine classic or not, but at the end of the day it is our call. A thousand dollars difference in value will not buy 20 years of range smiles or the sentimental value it will hold when I pass mine down to my children. I'll take the fun, smiles and joy over the money any day
30-35 years ago I acquired a 6" Python from an old man in his late 80s . He also sold me a 1917 Colt with holster that was pristine[both gun and holster]. He confided that he had "requisitioned " the 1917 in France and brought it home. I don't believe the gun had ever been fired outside of the factory.Anyway, that is another story. The Python had apparently been fired 6 rounds outside of the factory. I had carried a 4" Python through 21 months in Viet Nam because I couldn't find a 6" in Oakland, CA before my troop ship sailed. I REALLY wanted a 6".The old gentleman said he was about " to run out his string" and had no one to leave his guns to but, every one at the gun show was trying to rob him. I offered him a good price and got both at what I considered a very good price but still good for me.[Actually,I gave him a healthy price for the Python and he nearly gave me the 1917 because he really wanted someone to appreciate his Python and treat him with respect]. He told me he had gotten the first Python to come into the Colt distributor in Alabama but when he got it home he noticed the rib was "wavy". So he sent it to Colt for repair. He said the gun he got back was not the one he sent.The one I bought was serial #447!!! I bring this up because I kept the gun for nearly 20 years and could not bring myself to shoot such a pristine piece. I sold it to a collector in 1984 for the princely sum of,IIRC,$995.00! Why do I post this here? Well my friends, the money gave me a little pleasure, but nowhere near what I would have enjoyed shooting and owning it all these years! I appreciate collectors who keep pristine gun to show the rest of us what it was like leaving the factory, BUT, I kick my butt every time I think of selling that gun.Make your decision before you buy. To own a safe queen for posterity, or to own a shooting piece of plunder.Shoot it take care of it, don't abuse or ignore it, and cherish not only the gun but the wonderful times it provided you between the "cradle and the grave". You can't be buried with and it's next caretaker may sell it for dope money. BTW: I STILL have my 4" and will never part with it in this life, we owe each other our longevity.[she ain't sitting on a mantle in Northern Viet Nam, and neither am I!] Nick
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top