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Ok, here is my NIB '65 era DS. As I posted before, it's NIB and never been fired. It's a gorgeous gun, and I'm still torn over whether to shoot it or keep it mint.

Upon inspection I noticed a small mass of tiny dings above the right grip panel. I don't know what caused them, but would like to know what this does to the gun's overall collector's value.

Here is a photo of the marks, and some others as well.


On this one I broke my own rule about using a flash, but the camera was borrowed and not as sensitive to lower light.




 

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What this means is, you have a NIB gun that's in 99.9% condition, with what is known as a "storage mark".

This will reduce value by a few dollars.
The gun is still basically a NIB UNFIRED Colt.
 

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Still just about perfect. I agree that it probably does not lower the value much at all. I have an unfired DS (1962) without the box and I would easily purchase yours as a collector. My 62' DS started one of my many Colt addictions (had to get a Cobra, had to get a pre-war DS...). Enjoy, whether you decide to shoot this one or not.
 

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Nice looking Colt, but I would be a bit hesitant about advertising it as a 99.9% gun. Collector's eyeballs, and opinions, vary quite a bit when it comes to grading a firearm. New guns straight from the factory don't always meet the 100% mark, even though they are technically new and "unfired". NIB and 100% are not always synonymous.
Photographs are a poor way to grade anything, but the cluster of dings, the discoloration on the side of the hammer, and what appears to be the faint beginning of a turn ring, would not make a 99.9% in many circles. Please, don't get me wrong, and think I'm just trying to rain on your parade, because I'm not, and it is a darn nice piece, but there are folks out there who would be disappointed when they opened a box expecting a 99.9% gun....1/10% of anything is very, very, minute.
 

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I agree with 'Wheel', that is a 'storage', shipping or handling mark', NOT wear. Was there a brush ,with a loop handle in the box ,by chance?
That gun is 99.9 % to me anyway.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
[ QUOTE ]
I agree with 'Wheel', that is a 'storage', shipping or handling mark', NOT wear. Was there a brush ,with a loop handle in the box ,by chance?
That gun is 99.9 % to me anyway.;)

[/ QUOTE ]

Nope, it was wrapped in the orginal wax paper in the box.

Anyhow, I decided to shoot it. I'm not a collector and I don't think I would enjoy it fully unless I shot it. I decided the value wouldn't rise enough to warrant keeping it boxed for the next 20 years as opposed to shooting it now, and having a good time.

So NOW the question is...What ammo should I use? I know already that +p is a no-no. I have a box of new Winchester .38 148gr LWC ammo. Is this too heavy? It's not a hot SD load, just for target practice. I was planning on using the WWB .38 value pack from WalMart for plinking, but I'm not sure what to use for carry ammo. Any recommendations? Anything I should avoid?
 

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Since you don't reload,I guess,I would use 158 gr standard velocity for practice-and-your gun is a STEEL gun,it is 1965,it will handle +Ps for carry use and an occassional "orientation cylinder" to get the feel of the difference,between it and your practice ammo. This is why I don't recommend the 148 full wadcutters,they have the recoil of a .22,in some loadings.

One of the advantages a D.S. has over the smaller J Frame S&Ws,(besides a 6 shot!)is that they can handle some use of +P. I don't mean some hell bent 1200fps 110 gr. +P+,but I like the lead semi wadcutter hollow points,158 gr.,at about 950 fps in a 6" bbl,which ought give you 850 in a 2".

One other "suggestion",if you have never shot a D frame Colt,with the standard stocks; by a Tyler,or other brand,of grip adapter. There is not a lot of space between the front strap and rear of trigger guard;it can be "painful".And you will have better control for repeat shots.

You might even consider,"custom grips".

Shot 100 rds out of my 1932 vintage D.S. this past week;75 rds.reg.158 gr. handloads,25 were a "little warmer".

Glad you are going to fire it. I bought a 1952 NIB 5" Official Police .38 back in February;it has lost its virginity and is getting "experienced".

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

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That is certainly a great looking gun and I’d be very proud to own a gun like the one pictured!

But I would also like to chime in support of Mr. Buckeye’s comments. He really does hit the nail on the head when it comes to the grading system. Grading the condition of a gun is not nearly as exacting as say grading a coin, where there are clear and documented definitions with specifics that differentiate between one grade and another. Grading a gun as Mr. OB rightly points out, is often very subjective.

I think we all agree that this is a great gun in fantastic condition that any of us here would love to own. But I doubt that we could collectively agree on a percentage condition. And I also doubt that none of us here are really qualified to tack a % number on this gun based on a photo.

I hope Mr. Beltfed enjoys the shooting experience with this beauty queen.
 
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