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Adams & Adams did a Nimschke tribute series a few years ago. I think there were 25 in the series. I have only seen one. It is an incredibly beautiful piece of work.

I have always admired the gun that Yahoody posted. And I that is a great book.
 

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The Nimschke style scroll is very elegant, perhaps my favorite. Gorgeous gun! Look even better with ivory or pearls.

Whoever got the Helfrich style Adams & Adams gun 6Guns mentioned and LP linked; got one heck of a deal!
 

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LP - That is one of the Helfricht series that A&A did. Also a very nice series. But I have seen three or four of those. All of those I have seen had Ivory stocks. And they have all been nickel.

The only Nimschke that I saw was a blue/case gun with Ivory.
 

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Actually, by today's standards that is poor engraving. Look at the crude, non symmetrical loops, not even journeyman quality as done today. I think a lot of the old work was rushed out, it was not very expensive back then. Today, good engraving costs several times the cost of the gun. We call those 3 foot guns. Look fine from a distance, just do not look at them up close.
 

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I?ve seen some modern production guns which were, indeed, ?master? engraved and looked anything but; same things you mentioned. Uneven, asymmetrical scrolls, overuse of punch-dot backgrounds, etc.
 

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The so called Nimschke 44 is, in my opinion, a work by Samual Hodgson, who engraved from the early 1860's into the 1880's. He worked on early Henry's, 66 Winchesters and of course other guns including Colts. The specifics of the engraving, the cutting progressions, oval scrolls, large shading radius's and the number of them all strongly suggest Hodgson. None of the work resembles Nimschke's technique. That it is stated to be a Niimschke by Wilson is open to speculation, knowing how Wilson would "authentic" a piece for a price. Since Nimschke was a much more famous engraver than Hodgson, logic would dictate he'd transform it. Who would question him, he wrote the books? But he did know what makes a real Nimschke for sure, if only he could profit from it. That said, without Wilson and his publications, there would have been far less interest in the West, the guns and the people, and we owe that debt of gratitude. BTW, John Adams authenticated the engraved gun in the thread "Nimschke out of the woodwork" last year. He worked with Wilson during his early years as a writer, and has been a student of Nimschke's work for over 45 years. You'll find the thread at the bottom of this page under SIMILAR THREADS.

JP

JP
 

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The so called Nimschke 44 is, in my opinion, a work by Samual Hodgson, who engraved from the early 1860's into the 1880's. He worked on early Henry's, 66 Winchesters and of course other guns including Colts. The specifics of the engraving, the cutting progressions, oval scrolls, large shading radius's and the number of them all strongly suggest Hodgson. None of the work resembles Nimschke's technique. That it is stated to be a Niimschke by Wilson is open to speculation, knowing how Wilson would "authentic" a piece for a price. Since Nimschke was a much more famous engraver than Hodgson, logic would dictate he'd transform it. Who would question him, he wrote the books? But he did know what makes a real Nimschke for sure, if only he could profit from it. That said, without Wilson and his publications, there would have been far less interest in the West, the guns and the people, and we owe that debt of gratitude. BTW, John Adams authenticated the engraved gun in the thread "Nimschke out of the woodwork" last year. He worked with Wilson during his early years as a writer, and has been a student of Nimschke's work for over 45 years. You'll find the thread at the bottom of this page under SIMILAR THREADS.

JP

JP
thank you for your advice. I watched all the threads and I think it's hard to determine the truth.
My Colt AA has very shallow engravings of rare beauty. I bought it at auctions in the USA from France, looking at simple photographs.
I have other engraved colts including a 1851 by Young..but I like much more,the engravings of my Colt SAA which they are a great lightness ..
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That it is stated to be a Niimschke by Wilson is open to speculation, knowing how Wilson would "authenticate" a piece for a price. Since Nimschke was a much more famous engraver than Hodgson, logic would dictate he'd transform it. Who would question him, he wrote the books? But he did know what makes a real Nimschke for sure, if only he could profit from it. That said, without Wilson and his publications, there would have been far less interest in the West, the guns and the people, and we owe that debt of gratitude.
For this reason alone, as far as I am concerned, R Larry Wilson's books aren't worth the paper they are printed on and he is not a credible source. Any ass with a really good camera and wealthy contacts could have produced his books. Scholarly tomes they are not! Face it, they are merely coffee table books.

Since coffee table books sell well, especially since it is easier to look at a pretty photograph instead of reading minute details, it is probably true that his books did instill an interest in this stuff in numerous individuals.

However, numerous folks on this forum worship his books, and seem to speak highly of Wilson. They conveniently ignore the truth.
 

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Adams & Adams did a Nimschke tribute series a few years ago. I think there were 25 in the series. I have only seen one. It is an incredibly beautiful piece of work.

I have always admired the gun that Yahoody posted. And I that is a great book.


Yes, John Adams is a big fan of Nimschke. I'm friends with John a great guy and a true gentleman both father and son. I have had several guns engraved by him. I too am a big fan of the older classical engravers. Nimschke, Gustave Young, Cuno Helfricht and Rudolph Kornbrath. These 4 engravers are true old world engravers and their art is truly magnificent. I like the styles and the flow of their lines and vines that make the firearm stand out from the rest. John did do a run of 25 and I found out too late to purchase one from him. I am working on sending a gun out to him to engrave. I don't know when I'm going to be able to do it since every time I get ready to do it some thing comes up. Oh well such as life. Here are some of my guns he did.
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For this reason alone, as far as I am concerned, R Larry Wilson's books aren't worth the paper they are printed on and he is not a credible source. Any ass with a really good camera and wealthy contacts could have produced his books. Scholarly tomes they are not! Face it, they are merely coffee table books.

Since coffee table books sell well, especially since it is easier to look at a pretty photograph instead of reading minute details, it is probably true that his books did instill an interest in this stuff in numerous individuals.

However, numerous folks on this forum worship his books, and seem to speak highly of Wilson. They conveniently ignore the truth.
This is so true. When I contacted Wilson concerning the "Nimschke out of the woodwork" gun, he excitedly said send it along with 2500 bucks for a letter, but send it to his ASSOCIATE in San Francisco. I wouldn't pay that kind of money for any written opinion, even if it were the first gun Nimschke ever cut, but he continued the dialog for several weeks, offering a discount if I found the mate to the gun and suggesting it would be in his next book which was to replace the older work on engraving. When I mentioned his offer to a very well known auction house official, he said, and I quote "Are you crazy? If you send him that gun, you'll never see it again!" Fortunately, John Adams was kind enough to examine and evaluate this piece, and confirmed Nimschke's technique and style. The one thing about Wilson's examinations is that never is there any explanation of exactly what techniques were used, how the chisel was held to create a cut, what the depth is and other details. This is why the book by Fredric Harris, "Firearm Engraving As Decorative Art" is significant. Anyone seriously considering a Colt or Winchester with antique engraving needs to read this and read it well. Each engraver's technique is like a modern day finger print, irrefutable

JP.
 

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I like Wilsons books just to see the engraved guns and the styles that were used. As for his credibility ahhh not so much. Trust factor None. I have heard horror stories of him keeping original guns and having a modern duplicate made to exact and giving that to the owner. Again these are rumors and I have no facts to confirm nor deny the allegations. I was told he was incarcerated for some shenanigans some years back. Oh well for what it's worth the pics of the engraved guns are real and are nice to look at. I use them to get ideas to how I want my guns engraved.
 

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He served a year in prison for fist degree fraud, and could not own weapons after that. This is why he wanted me to send the gun down state. The fraud charge stemmed from his purchasing Colts at say, 50,000, and selling them to a wealthy doctor (Murphy) for 150,000 or more to get a larger commission, even though the value was realistically nearer to 50K. When the doctor went to sell his collection, it hit the fan. Of course, to those he gave appraisals to that inflated the value or the provenance of their guns, he's iconic and misaligned. The sad reality is that there are hundreds of engraved guns in the market that have nothing to do with the masters but have been lettered so by Wilson.

jp
 
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