Colt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was buying a second series Woodsman the other day and gentleman also had this C. Sharps pepperbox. I did not have a pepperbox so this one followed me home. Best I can tell it was made between 1859 and 1862. Matching serial numbers on the barrel and frame. Put a micrometer to the barrels and it looks like it is a .30 rimfire. Other than that I do not know a lot about it, just that is cool. lol
















 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Depending on how I held the micrometer the barrels were 7.3-7.45 which is in the .29 range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,979 Posts
well i have been really liking those old ones like that for a long time...well done...
 
  • Like
Reactions: ei8ht

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,335 Posts
Beautiful derringer, I would love to have one like that. you called it a pepperbox, I thought a pepperbox was a cap and ball with a rotating barrel ?...I would call that a derringer, might be wrong ?
Any body know for sure ?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
From Wikipedia and we all know that it is never wrong....lol

The pepper-box revolver or simply pepperbox is a multiple-barrel repeating firearm that has three or more barrels grouped around a central axis. It mostly appears in the form of a multi-shot handheld firearm. Pepperboxes exist in all ammunition systems: matchlock, wheellock, flintlock, caplock, pinfire, rimfire and centerfire. While pepperboxes are usually handguns, a few rifle-sized guns were made: Samuel Colt owned a revolving 3-barrel matchlock musket from India,[SUP][1][/SUP] and an 8-barrelled pepperbox shotgun was designed; but never went into production.

The pepperbox should not be confused with a volley gun; the difference is that a volleygun fires all the barrels simultaneously while the pepperbox is a repeater.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
Saw an Article in the recent Winter Edition of "Guns of the Old West" Magazine about an Historic Pepperbox and showed it to the Wife. Surprise! She liked it and said "Why don't we get one for our upcoming Anniversary"! So, delivered to my door via UPS 3 days later (from Guns International Listing) - love those antiques- from River Junction Trade Co - a c.1868+/- 22 Short First Model Sharp's Derringer. Thank You, Hon!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
475 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Saw an Article in the recent Winter Edition of "Guns of the Old West" Magazine about an Historic Pepperbox and showed it to the Wife. Surprise! She liked it and said "Why don't we get one for our upcoming Anniversary"! So, delivered to my door via UPS 3 days later (from Guns International Listing) - love those antiques- from River Junction Trade Co - a c.1868+/- 22 Short First Model Sharp's Derringer. Thank You, Hon!
Very nice. I like those grips and the case. I am jealous.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
641 Posts
I have a Colt New Line .22 that someone suggested shooting CB caps through, but I don't know what those are or where to get them. Any help? Thx.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
From Wikipedia. You can find them on the internet.

HistoryDesigned to be a cross between the .22 BB and .22 Short, and first catalogued in around 1888 (though probably first made before that), it "managed to combine about all the disadvantages...[of both] into one generally useless cartridge",[SUP][3][/SUP] being no more accurate than either while being noisier than the .22 BB Cap, and also penetrating much deeper requiring a backstop as strong as the .22 Short, and thereby negating the BB Cap's advantages for shooting indoors.[SUP][3][/SUP] However, the cartridge found use in Europe in cheap rifles meant for short range pest control well into the twentieth century.
American ammunition manufacturers dropped it in the 1940s, while RWS in Germany, Eley-Kynoch in Britain, and Alcan continued to offer it into the 1970s.[SUP][3][/SUP] In some European countries, 6mm Flobert cartridges are still manufactured and sold, as they are used in "Flobert revolvers" which are usually unaffected by gun laws (e.g. in Czech Republic and Slovakia, Flobert revolvers fall within the same weapon category as air rifles), and they are also used in antique firearms chambered for the .22 Short and the .22 Long, as most modern ammunition is of a much higher pressure than the old black powder cartridges these guns were chambered for.
DescriptionDue to their low power, CB rounds can be trapped by most pellet gun traps. This will however result in significant bumps in the pellet trap, and is not recommended. In longer rifle barrels the CB has a very quiet, seemingly non-existent report due to the lack of residual pressure at the muzzle (see Internal ballistics). However, the CB loses velocity fast in longer barrels, due to the lack of anything other than the primer as a propellant.
The original .22 CB cartridge has the same case as the .22 BB, but there are now low-power .22 rounds sold as .22 CB Short and .22 CB Long which come in the more common .22 rimfire cartridge cases. The .22 CB primer fired rounds has a reduced powder load and is kept between 350 and 720 ft/s, while the regular .22 Short has an increased powder amount, and launches the same 29 gr bullet around and above 1000 ft/s. So while having the same length, the modern primer fired .22 CB Short & Long rounds, and the regular .22 Short are different cartridges. Other modern rounds, such as the .22 Aguila Colibri and .22 Aguila Super Colibri have bullets in the same weight range as the regular CB Cap with velocities in the 300 ft/s to 500 ft/s range, essentially making them somewhat weak CB Caps in .22 Long Rifle cases. The longer cases of the CB Short & Long and the Colibri rounds, will allow the rounds to be fired in magazine fed firearms, in which the tiny CB Cap cases would jam.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top