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Discussion Starter #1
Colt has refused to work on my Python and sent it back to my FFL. They said it had been worked on by a "non-Colt" smith at one time. It probably was worked on, by the armorer from the previous owners law enforcement agency. It's almost 45 years old and the timing is off. I was willing to pay them to fix it.

I guess the "new" Colt doesn't want to deal with any "old" Colt problems. I guess their "service" department is for "Warranty" work only and has enough business that they don't need or want anything extra. I was more than willing to pay. This isn't right, but I will find a qualified smith to work on it.

Anyone else have this pleasant an experience?
 

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I haven't sent them any older guns in recent years . Just a few newer mfg models .
About 6 yrs ago I sent them my 2nd Gen 1968 vintage SAA for re-nickel and do some trigger work . The work was done 8 wks and resonably priced . I was well pleased with the work performed and the service in general .
 

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Depending on what was previously done to the revolver they may not be able to replace certain parts needed and still satisfy the customer. For an example, like the frame would need replacing thus destroying the value of a 45 year old model.
Give Pittsburg Handgun Headquarters a call.
(412) 766-6100
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I guess what has me really pissed off is that they didn't say "why" or what they found that caused them to make that decision. Tell what was done to it so I can make an informed decision as to what to do next.

I sent an email off to Cylinder & Slide for their opinion and estimate.
 

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Colt no longer has many parts for older Colt's, so they just aren't able to do some things now.
Blame the financial problems for this.

In the case of a Python, for which they DO have parts, it's likely a case of something being so altered, that it just can't be put back into factory specs.

The problem with attempting repairs to a gun that's had something altered by a non-qualified gunsmith is, once you take on the job, IT'S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

The problem is, if you get into it and find out it's just not correctable, the customer still DEMANDS that you make it "right".

Also there's the liability issue.
If it can't be put into factory spec, and something happens, NO MATTER WHAT, or WHO is "responsible" Colt figures on getting sued for returning a non-spec gun to a customer.
In Colt's condition, they just CAN'T afford to take the chance.

Refusing work for this reason is a standard in MOST service departments.

I'm a retired Master watchmaker/gunsmith/holster maker.
I routinely turned away work that had been altered improperly by non-qualified personnel.
Either because I couldn't be 100% SURE of putting it back into factory spec condition, or because it COULDN'T be corrected.

Again, take the job on, it's YOURS.
Once you take it on, the customer demands you fix it or give him a new item, or whatever HE thinks is the "right" amount of money.

I suggest, as above, contacting Pittsburgh Handgun Headquarters.
They used to be the Colt factory "over-flow" for warranty work.

The apparently have plenty of parts for older guns, and may be able to fix your gun.

However, police armorer or not, if something has been altered that can't be corrected, few if any standard repair services will touch it.

Other than Pittsburgh or Cylinder & Slide, the only other option is to ask the Colt Custom Shop to attempt a restoration to the gun.
IF they took it on, expect BIG BUCKS charges for high-level custom work.

This is an unfortunate result of the current "Rein of Terror" by lawyers.

Take ANY object with safety "issues", alter something that can't be restored to factory condition, then ask the factory to do repairs of any sort.
They will ALL refuse to do so.

Make no difference whether it's a gun, a car, or an egg beater.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is the first used revolver I have bought. I never thought about checking the timing/lockup before I bought it. Shame on me. This could be a painful lesson, but one I will never make again.
 

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Oh, brother! Very sorry to hear about your Colt treatment ... For one, I can't excuse a, "No help/no explanation," no matter what the cicumstances. I'm sure dfarris is right on the money, as usual, but what's fair is fair and this ain't! For what it's worth, I've had several older Pythons and Official Police's and Officer's Match, etc. and timing is their bugaboo. Don't get me wrong, ... I prefer the Colt I and E's to anything else but timing strength is for sure NOT their long suit. When we buy one of these - even a Python, it can for sure be a problem and is something to watch out for.
 
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