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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The story of the acquisition is verified, prior to the widow selling it for sixty five dollars it is not. I've convinced the owner to get a letter. Any info would be appreciated, thank you. He has the flap holster also but didn't bring it to church today. The holster has a lower buckle, not a rawhide lace tie.



 

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The story of the acquisition is verified, prior to the widow selling it for sixty five dollars it is not. I've convinced the owner to get a letter. Any info would be appreciated, thank you. He has the flap holster also but didn't bring it to church today. The holster has a lower buckle, not a rawhide lace tie.



squawberryman,

M1911 No 122290 is one of 1000 (121601 - 122600), shipped 10 Aug 1915 to the Springfield Armory, Massachusetts. A COLT letter will Not have much more information (unless the Assembly date is requested).

Best Regards,
 

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The rounded ends on the letters doesn't look right to me. Makes me think engraved.
The curved intersections of the "R" looks strange for a die-stamped letter. The right-hand intersection of the "N" strokes do not look continuous like from a die either. If the "N.R.A." marking was applied with a die after the frame was finished, would there be some signs of metal displacement? Were "N.R.A." markings found on other 1911s applied with a die or by engraving?
 

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From the article:
"These guns bore full military markings, but they had “N.R.A.” stamped on their frames to show they were not stolen government property."
That might explain what looks like an engraved marking from somewhere in a 1911's distant past.
 

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The additional pistols shown exhibit the square ends of the letters, while the blowup of the original pistol appears to show rounded ends. Maybe a closeup of the marking would clear things up.

The original N.R.A. marking was hand applied, and will show slight variations due to force, alignment, and positioning of the die.
 

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Provenance can assuage originality worries more than engraving minutia, to me. If the widow can tell you when her husband got it, or has some documentation from the NRA - I'd feel good about it.

I don't quite understand the OP's statement about stories and such. But if she says, say, "I remember he got it from dad, who was a life member of the NRA in 1920 ..." that means a lot, and whoever stamped them for the NRA used different methods.
 

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Information on the different methods used to stamp the N.R.A. would be helpful.
I agree. That's the reason for my question regarding if there are any known legitimate engraved "N.R.A." markings. Personally, as a collector, I am just not comfortable with the inherent risk in buying non-standard configuration firearms that are not well documented.
 

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The curved intersections of the "R" looks strange for a die-stamped letter. The right-hand intersection of the "N" strokes do not look continuous like from a die either. If the "N.R.A." marking was applied with a die after the frame was finished, would there be some signs of metal displacement? Were "N.R.A." markings found on other 1911s applied with a die or by engraving?
Both, but I think the engraved markings are spurious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The "story" is that the deceased man received it from a general, then the fact that the widow sold the gun to Charlie's son. Regarding collector value, if the stamp worried someone and they didn't spend the sixty five dollars......
 
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