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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Saw something today I've never encountered before. A friend bought it recently and showed it to me. It is a Crescent-Davis single shot pistol in 410 gauge. It is a break action with an external hammer, blued barrel, case hardened frame and hammer, nice wood pistol grip and fore stock. It is in very excellent condition, maybe 98%+. I understand it was manufactured in the late 20s and it is very sweet. Anybody know anything about these; rarity, value... It is an interesting piece and I'm curious.
 

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From your description is it probably a highly illegal gun. If it is smooth bore and has barrel length less than 18 inches and/or overall length less than 34 inches, it can qualify the possessor for several years free room and board at a Federal insititution.

There was a procedure for registry making such guns legal. If it was registered and the documentation is at hand, it can be legal. The window is closed for registering an un-registered piece.

I would avoid contact with the gun & my statistics are from my failing memory -- but I wouldn't want to have them confirmed or corrected the hard way.
 

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rhmc24,
I thought if it was manufactured as a pistol originally, it was legal. That's why the new lever action pistols like Steve McQueen's is legal whereas a sawed off 94 would be illegal unless registered.
 

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It is classed under tha NFA as a Firearm, in the any other weapon category. Problem is that it is a short-barrelled (or "sawed-off") shotgun, not that it was designed as a pistol. I think there are ways to legally own it, but you would have to talk with someone more familiar with BATFE regulations in that regard.

Personally, I would have nothing to do with it unless it was properly papered. There were numerous similar guns made by several manufacturers and sold back in the pre-NFA days. It's probably long overdue for a swim in deep water.
 

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I don't remember when they were made but back in the old days they were referred to as a "horse pistol" a lot of folks carried them in their buggys,they were legal back then & it used to be if it was in fact what I'm talking about there was a way of getting paperwork on them because they were "manufactured" that way,but w/all the restrictive laws today I don't know if that's still possible.
 

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It's listed here in the atfs C&R book on page 46:

http://www.atf.gov/publications/download/p/atf-p-5300-11/atf-p-5300-11.pdf

It is under this heading:

SECTION IV: National Firearms Act WeaponsClassified As Curios Or Relics Under 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44​
The Bureau has determined that the following NFA weapons are curios or relics as defined in 27 CFR 478.11 because oftheir dates of manufacture. These NFA weapons, classified as curios or relics, are still subject to all the controls underthe NFA. However, licensed collectors may acquire, hold, or dispose of them as curios or relics subject to theprovisions of 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44 and 27 CFR Part 478. They are still "firearms" as defined in 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44and 26 U.S.C. Chapter 53.​
 
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