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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to look at a .22 Officers Model Target. I already have one from 1939 that looks like this:


The one I'm getting looks like it's front sight has a bead at the top, not a flat type like above. It also has the two-band knurling on the ejector rod tip.

When did Colt change to the flat top front sight on the .22s? When did they get away from the single band knurled ejector? This should help me guage what year it is (just for fun), before I see it and it's serial no.
 

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I "think" (note the qualifier) that the bead sight was not standard production.
It was either an option or an after-market addition.

The best way to determine the age is by serial number.
You can find the serial number ranges for the Officer's Models online. Note that the .22 numbers are often in the Official Police ranges.

You can access this list with a cell phone......


And you can access the Colt factory look up table......

 

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One of my OM revolvers has a quasi bead type front sight.

It is not the flat and squared basic blade but a contoured torpedo like top of front blade (all blued) that is similar to a bead at the back end for sighting.
True bead front sights, I think have a small gold 'bead' at that point.

Over time I have seen pictures of the OM on this forum having the front sight that mine has. So,maybe that one is simply a variation available by Colt w/o special order... ???

Nice revolvers esp the .22 lr.

I hope you post follow up pictures !
 

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One of my OM revolvers has a quasi bead type front sight.

It is not the flat and squared basic blade but a contoured torpedo like top of front blade (all blued) that is similar to a bead at the back end for sighting.
True bead front sights, I think have a small gold 'bead' at that point.

Over time I have seen pictures of the OM on this forum having the front sight that mine has. So,maybe that one is simply a variation available by Colt w/o special order... ???

Nice revolvers esp the .22 lr.

I hope you post follow up pictures !

Just saw the link pictures.

That front sight looks kind of like the one mine has.....
 

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Colt offered bead front sights in either gold or ivory. These were paired with a U channel rear sight. From my meager collection of pre-war target colt revolvers, it appears common that early guns had bead front sights and later guns had patridge ( flat) front sights paired with a square notch rear sight. The bead sights were designed to aim in the middle of the bullseye while the patridge front sights were designed for the more modern 6 o’clock hold on the black.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I know they also had a round top steel "bead" and u-notch rear on the early years. As evidenced by my photo of two of them. But I'm trying to figure out if the Officers .22 ever had that type.
 

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Here are a few pics of my OMT .22 from 1932. It is prior to the introduction of the Heavy Barrel and the front sight boss and blade are quite different than those used on my 1940 OMT .38 with the Heavy Barrel. One of the curiousities of the ejector rod heads is also the use of color case hardening on some, but not all variations. For example, the ERH on my 1939 Detective Special is like the one below on my 1932 OMT, but is blued rather than CCH.
701754
701755
701756
701757
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Walter, I think that "square tip" overhang is what I'm seeing in the sellers very blurry picture. I should know today what I'm looking at, when it's in hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
OK, I got it. It is a 71xx serial, 1932. Mine has the squared tip partridge, and the double knurled ejector. My hypothesis is they were changing to the dougle knurling, long ejector rod tip that year.
Roger, I'm guessing your serial number is earlier than 71xx?
More pics later.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, it's kind of worn all in the leads. It could be it's been fired like 400,000 rounds though too. I just checked it upside down, slow single action. It drops into the center of the lead. The wear could have been from a long time ago, then the next owner had it adjusted....in 1952 or something!
My belief is they made the lead for a reason, it's going to have wear. At least it's not like the new Cobras and Pythons, about twice as long a lead. Just in case the timing is a little early, they don't have to do anything about it.
 

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Azshot, my OMT .22 from 1932 (I have not lettered it) with the short ejector rod head is S/N in the low 6900 range. Maybe the early 1930's were the transition between the short and long ERH, and Colt's had a big old bin full of those parts mixed together and the assembler just grabbed one from the top and screwed it onto the rod.

It would be interesting to see production figures of the OMT's from the early 1930's. I can't imagine that in the midst of the Great Depression that they were selling many of their premium target models as opposed to OP's for various police agencies.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I took it out plinking. It seems accurate, I'll know for sure when I can get to a range. This one will be my holster gun, it already has a lot of wear. It has a light, nice single action trigger pull, and even a good DA.

My other one in .22 is nicer, and I've always hated to carry it and wear the finish. But I do shoot it a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I carried it on a walk with the dog this morning before the heat comes up. Brauer Bros holster fits it nicely.

702252
702253
 
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