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OH "J", I am Sooo sorry for you scoring your first original Colt. You now have the disease. and the only cure is more Colt originals...
you will wake up in the middle of the night and go to the site to place bids, you will search everywhere for the one you want.
and then......you will check the USPS Tracking number twenty times a day to see where it is and when it will be there...
Oh. so sorry for you....
From the rest of us with this dreaded disease. Ken View attachment 727170
He has the FEVER.
 

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View attachment 741151 g
Can you say a little more about these 1851 Navy's?
They are 2nd Gen C series Colts that the American Historical Foundation made Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps commemoratives out of in the mid 80s. The series was limited to 100 Navies for each branch.
 
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I was sure that these Navy's are 2nd Generation Colts but I've never seen these edition before,
 

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Beautiful work!
 

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Wonder where they all ended up.....
 

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I am very familiar with this particular set. As was mentioned, these are 2nd generation Colt Navy 1851's ("F" series, not "C" series) modified by the American Historical Foundation in 1984 - 1985 (Army and Marine Corps) and 1986 - 1987 (Navy and Air Force) as a tribute to the military branches of the service. One-hundred guns of each service was produced. The model numbers are: F1100A (Army), F1100MC (Marine Corps), F1100N (Navy), and F1100AF (Air Force).

As you notice in the picture, each gun has a different color scheme.
Top-Left (Marine Corps) - loading lever and cylinder are silver plated - everything else is gold plated.
Top-Right (Air Force) - loading lever and cylinder are gold plated - everything else is silver plated.
Bottom-Left (Navy) - everything silver plated.
(Bottom-Right (Army) - everything gold plated.

The enclosed medals were not part of the sets and were purchased separately from the U.S. Mint.

Where did all the 400 guns end up - more than likely these guns were purchased for/by members of their respective services. Since most military folks hold on to souvenirs of their particular service, these guns mostly only show up during estate sales. The Marine Corps gun was the most difficult to find. It took 7 years. The next most difficult was the Air Force.

These guns were originally marked at $1995 by the American Historical Foundation and, on purchase, a customer could have his name engraved on the left side of the barrel and on the backstrap.

By the way, the Air Force model had two designs. The gun on the left, at the back of the barrel, has a different circular design than the one on the right. Also, the gun on the left will have "United States Air Force" inscribed on the barrel, while the gun on the right has "U.S. Army Air Force." I was never able to find the gun on the right. This will be a challenge for fingersmcgee.

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Trying to get a handle on how many of you are interested in these . Please post your Colt percussion revolver photos here :cool:

Thank you !
I don't have any "real great" '51 Navy's, but do have a couple of plain examples. This one has the interesting even SN 152000. Many collectors may not be aware, but these percussion revolvers were carried as long as the late 1870's.
 

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I hope the next generation retains an interest in these beauties- fantastic workmanship and full of history. That’s one reason I have a small selection of Colt percussions- to wake up my children’s interest, and make history come alive... but also because they’re beautiful and interesting :)
 
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