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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I, like many budding curmudgeon reloaders, have one of the excellent but flawed Ohaus Dou-Measures. The problem was always the reservoir, which was fragile where it slipped into the measure body. They chipped, cracked and broke at the two screw holes. Ohaus supported the measure for a few years, but replacements are decades gone.

I have emailed Lee to see if they could make an adapter to use their reservoirs. Although they would sell no measures, they would sell adapters and reservoirs.The Ohaus body measures 0.980" at the insertion point and goes nominally 0.375" into the measure body. Does anyone know of another measure's reservoir which is compatible?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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Discussion Starter #4
Check the link for a home made powder magazine (reservoir)

Ohaus powder measure rebuild
Found what I thought was the perfect bottle: high density polyethylene pump soap bottle, about 1 liter. Nice and thivck and the neck diameter .980" - just what is needed. Carefully removed the threads and it went in with a satisfying slip fit. Ah, but the measure handle hits it. There is a member at Northwest Firearms who has offered to make a riser/adapter for me. If I cannot find an ABS or PVC plumbing connector that will work, I'll take him up on his offer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Aha!

OK. I found a super-secret European source (which I cannot divulge) for Ohaus Powder measure reservoirs. The measure opening is 0.890" which struck me as an odd dimension. However, the typical 2 liter soda bottle (and many smaller plastic bottles) measures the same around its neck once the threads are removed. So I found a mandrel over which the bottle neck would fit. Clamped the mandrel in a vise and, using a couple different coarse files, I worked my way around the neck, making sure I didn't cut into the neck itself, but just removed the threads. Finished up with a flat mill file and it turned out pretty well.

I had the measure body handy and tried fit several times. Once it was a snug, no-rattle slip fit, I stopped and cleaned the plastic "curls" up with a small wire brush. There was still a trace of the threads left, so trial fitting as you go is the best. As to trimming the thin plastic bottom of the bottle off, I puzzled over that until it hit me that I could simply freeze some water in the bottle and use a utility knife to cut the bottom off. I held the bottle in the corner of a counter top so that I could simply rotate it using the neck and hold the knife steady. A little file work and some wet-or-dry on the cut edge and it was good to go.

Now, the Ohaus measures have dual opposing screws which engaged oversized holes in the OEM reservoir. Convenient, but this allowed the reservoir to rock slightly - which it did from the lever banging against the stop at both ends of the stroke. Eventually, the plastic cracked and the reservoir was on its way out. And, those threads were a comparatively small 8-32 thread.

I drilled the holes out slightly and tapped them 10-32, which is a substantially larger thread. I then drilled pilot holes through the bottle neck, tapping them 10-32 as well. I ran the tap through the measure body and into the bottle neck, so that the threads would be "timed." Thus, the reservoir screws (and the friction fit) keep the reservoir tightly snugged into the measure body. A perusal of my bottle cap collection (don't ask) turned up an old mayo or salad dressing lid that was a perfect slip fit over the bottle bottom (top?). A little creative de-burring of the 10-31 threads in the measure body and bottle neck and all was well.

A spritz of Hornady One-Shot Case Lube (dry, non-contaminating lube) on the drum and its cavity in the measure body and it is running as smooth as ever and we are back in business. Also, I went to a plastics engineering blog and found that soda bottle plastic (PET or PETE) is one of the lowest static plastics of those commonly available, so it should not cause the powder to cling or bunch up. A win-win.
 

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