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This Colt SAA has me puzzled as to the numbers found on the gun. The serial #112112 places it around the late 1880's, but the other two have me stumped. On the cylinder is the #112 or 113, the last is fairly worn and hard to tell. The other number is on the bottom of the grip171. Do you think it's a pieced together gun or are different numbers stamped on pistols of that era for manufacturing procedures?
As for the grips on it, I cannot figure out why someone would put that style of home made grips on it, but I will say that they are nicely done, just ugly as can be though.
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That means you have a parts gun that has been made from components from other guns. It also has been heavily buffed which most likely removed other numbers such as those on the trigger guard. I recommend you read through the first 50 or so pictures of this guide as it will help you understand what the numbers mean and how things have changed over the years.
 

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It has definitely been buffed hard and refinished. I do have to agree that the grips are kind of ugly, but they are also interesting. Somebody put a lot of work into them.
Be aware, it is also a blackpowder frame so do not shoot modern smokeless ammo.
 

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This Colt SAA has me puzzled as to the numbers found on the gun. The serial #112112 places it around the late 1880's, but the other two have me stumped. On the cylinder is the #112 or 113, the last is fairly worn and hard to tell. The other number is on the bottom of the grip171. Do you think it's a pieced together gun or are different numbers stamped on pistols of that era for manufacturing procedures?
As for the grips on it, I cannot figure out why someone would put that style of home made grips on it, but I will say that they are nicely done, just ugly as can be though. View attachment 706424 View attachment 706425 View attachment 706426 View attachment 706427
Your Colt SAA has a backstrap and trigger guard from a Colt M1860 Army. That is why the grip is longer than normal, and the butt was made ready for a 1860 Army shoulder stock (the extra milled cut near heel).

The cylinder number is faint, but is a 112, and may have been a 2112. The entire gun was heavily buffed and re-nickeled.
 

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I'm an old man (81) who has been interested in and studying Colt SAAs since I was 12 and I remember that back then it was alm0st common to find SAAs with Army grip frames on them. Anyone with large hands could easily buy an old Army for a few dollars and rob the parts they wanted from it.
 

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I wouldn't do a thing to that gun other than enjoy it as is. Someone put a great deal of effort and skill into making those grips and I doubt you will ever find another set like them. And... a shop is no place for bare feet! Get some shoes on before you get a cut or step on something sharp.;)
 

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Yes, it’s definitely been heavily buffed - as seen by the rounded edges and then has been refinished, but the very stylish grips do make it all very appealing !


Jim
 

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I just noticed the US Army markings on the barrel. It appears as though it has the DFC inspector mark. US military inspector, David F. Clark. Inspected from 1880-1887.
 
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