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Some one made a post on another forum about his dad's use of a 1911 to kill a German who was attempting to bayonet him in WWI.
He shot the German three times and since the bayonet had cut his gas mask he took the Germans, but was still gassed.

This brought back a long forgotten memory about what my dad told me about my uncle's service in WWI.
I'll re-post what I posted on the other forum:

An uncle on my dad's side was a front lines messenger in WWI, and was also gassed but survived into the 1920's.

My dad told me that his older brother carried TWO 1911 .45 autos in what from the description sounds like Model 1916 hip holsters, one on each side, the one on the left butt forward due to the right handed holster.
Also on the belt was a Model 1917/1918 spike blade steel knuckle bow trench knife.

My dad said his brother brought his pistols, trench knife, and pistol belt home but he had no idea where they went.
After my dad left home they disappeared from the foot locker that belonged to his brother.

Dad said that his brother told him that in addition to his messenger duties he was often called on to go on patrols in No Man's Land between the trenches.
He told dad that he carried the two .45's, the trench knife, and grenades on these patrols and had made use of all these on a number of nights.

He told dad that like most doughboys he carried his "makings" ( tobacco and cigarette papers) in his gas mask to keep them dry and he was gassed when the tobacco bag caused his mask to not seal properly.
The whiff of gas ended his smoking, and eventually his life after the war was over.
 

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Interesting story from long ago. Thanks for reposting it. Part of my early childhood was spent living with my Grandfather and Grandmother in a small Iowa town in the late 40's. There was a "town idiot" (very unflattering term for an old man with a history) who wandered around town mumbling to himself and who did odd jobs to survive. My Grandfather told me he had been gassed in WWI in France and he never was "right" after he returned from the war. He did odd jobs for us and was very nice to me but I could never understand what he was rambling about. That was supposed to be "the war to end all wars" but sadly that didn't happen.
 

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Damage to the lungs is usually permanent. My father's lungs were compromised from his service in WW2 working on ships in southern England in preparation for D-Day. He eventually died (about 15 years later) after having part of one lung removed at a VA hospital.
 

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My grandfather served in France in the first war and died at 44 at the beginning of the blitz from lung cancer.Ive always thought it had to be more than cigarettes.
 

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My Grandfather was gassed in the trenches of France, also.................

He returned to CT where the doctors gave him a few years to live, that could be supplemented if he'd relocate to Arizona and worked outside in dry air.

He chose to stay in CT working as a Plumber in and out doors, smoking Camels and Chesterfields over his lifetime. He raised three daughters and lived until 75, dying as the results of a series of strokes and emphysema.............

To Me, ................He was "Bigger than Life itself".......I will never forget him.

Tom
 

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Anyone that is interested enough can do a YouTube search for "WWI Shell Shock." The videos that pop up are heart-breaking.
 

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I remember a teacher when I was in high school (1950's) who was a WWI veteran and who also had been gassed. He was a bit stooped and he seemed to have almost no neck, all of which I assumed to be affects of his service. Back in the '50's I don't recall anyone thinking much about the Great War or those who served and sacrificed while serving in it. We all thought 'The War" was WWII which had ended only a little over ten years earlier. To day WWI is much more a source of interest and study than it was over fifty years ago. Just look at the search and interest, and prices paid, for an honest, original, 1914 -1918 Model 1911!
 
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