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Discussion Starter #1
Opinions? Maybe actually owned/fired the two? Anybody got a thought on out-of-the-box accuracy comparing a Python and a Gold Cup? (I'm figuring 6" P. and standard 5" GC?) Which shoots smaller groups? Why is there no printed anything about the GC? I asked in the auto forum and you can still hear the hollow thud.
 

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I'll take a stab at this. Personal experience only.

I do a lot of 22 shooting. There is, at least for me, a slight, but consistent edge in accuracy in favor of my preferred automatic over any of my revolvers (PPT, OMT, OMM, Diamondback, S&W Outdoorsman, and S&W K 22 Masterpiece) in 22 LR. Because of this I usually shoot an automatic, my favorite is a Hamden made High Standard Victor- it's a bit better shooter in my hands than either of my Third series Match Target Woodsman models, perhaps in part because its geometry so closely matches the 45 rather than any inherent accuracy edge (no, I haven't yet found an Ace in really fine condition).

Because of the extensive 22 usage I find it a bit easier to score well with a National Match (pre Gold Cup era) than I do with a Python. Probably this is due to "body memory" of some sort as much as any failing on the part of the Python.

Perhaps a more direct comparison would be the Python and the Mk III Gold Cup, a version that is like an ordinary Gold Cup externally, but is really a blowback operated pistol that fires the 38 Special wadcutter load (only). I do not believe that this model Gold Cup is inherently more accurate than a really well set up Python, but at the time that the Mk III was in production, when the pressure was on in a bullseye match many of the shooters did opt for the Mk III (or the S&W M 52).

All of the above presumes that you've learned to manage the Gold Cup. While a 185 or 200 grain SWC target load is a bit easier to shoot well than hardball, no 1911 type pistol will forgive even slightly wandering attention.

In its own way the Python (6"), due to its underlug (a primitive version of the stabilizers now used by some free pistol shooters) sort of "hangs there": if you are in good form it will almost help you shoot.

One other point. While good fitting stocks are very important on your automatics they are absolutely critical for revolvers. If you shoot single action you will find that if your hand does not return to the same location after cocking you will drop points. If you shoot double action a set of stocks ill fits your hand leads to misery.

In short, I believe that many shooters will find the Gold Cup a bit more accurate than the Python, but this is due, in my opinion, primarily to common equipment usage and practice.

Were we still a nation of revolver shooters as was the case until the late 1920's or early 1930's I believe that the Python would universally considered the more accurate of the two handguns. You might note that until the mid 1920's many top competitors shot bullseye matches for the 45 ACP with revolvers... Roper painted a memorable word picture of shooters with yards of friction tape wound around their palms to minimize the "bite" of the prawl of a factory stocked triplelock.

Bob

[This message has been edited by bfoster (edited 11-01-2003).]
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fascinating reading. Thank you, Sir! I agree with all you say about the Python. That barrel weight really helps, doesn't it? My 6" .357 doesn't have that and it's, well, ... it's NOT a Python! I want to ad a .45 to my box sometime and I'm considering the GC for target/range shooting - no hunting or concealed carry, just BULLSEYES! I often get tangled up with the notion, I guess from many years ago, that a guy ought to have three pistols: the civilian gun, the policeman's gun and the soldier's gun; a .22, a .38 revolver and the .45 auto. (For my money, all Colts, of course!) <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bfoster:
I'll take a stab at this. Personal experience only.

I do a lot of 22 shooting. There is, at least for me, a slight, but consistent edge in accuracy in favor of my preferred automatic over any of my revolvers (PPT, OMT, OMM, Diamondback, S&W Outdoorsman, and S&W K 22 Masterpiece) in 22 LR. Because of this I usually shoot an automatic, my favorite is a Hamden made High Standard Victor- it's a bit better shooter in my hands than either of my Third series Match Target Woodsman models, perhaps in part because its geometry so closely matches the 45 rather than any inherent accuracy edge (no, I haven't yet found an Ace in really fine condition).

Because of the extensive 22 usage I find it a bit easier to score well with a National Match (pre Gold Cup era) than I do with a Python. Probably this is due to "body memory" of some sort as much as any failing on the part of the Python.

Perhaps a more direct comparison would be the Python and the Mk III Gold Cup, a version that is like an ordinary Gold Cup externally, but is really a blowback operated pistol that fires the 38 Special wadcutter load (only). I do not believe that this model Gold Cup is inherently more accurate than a really well set up Python, but at the time that the Mk III was in production, when the pressure was on in a bullseye match many of the shooters did opt for the Mk III (or the S&W M 52).

All of the above presumes that you've learned to manage the Gold Cup. While a 185 or 200 grain SWC target load is a bit easier to shoot well than hardball, no 1911 type pistol will forgive even slightly wandering attention.

In its own way the Python (6"), due to its underlug (a primitive version of the stabilizers now used by some free pistol shooters) sort of "hangs there": if you are in good form it will almost help you shoot.

One other point. While good fitting stocks are very important on your automatics they are absolutely critical for revolvers. If you shoot single action you will find that if your hand does not return to the same location after cocking you will drop points. If you shoot double action a set of stocks ill fits your hand leads to misery.

In short, I believe that many shooters will find the Gold Cup a bit more accurate than the Python, but this is due, in my opinion, primarily to common equipment usage and practice.

Were we still a nation of revolver shooters as was the case until the late 1920's or early 1930's I believe that the Python would universally considered the more accurate of the two handguns. You might note that until the mid 1920's many top competitors shot bullseye matches for the 45 ACP with revolvers... Roper painted a memorable word picture of shooters with yards of friction tape wound around their palms to minimize the "bite" of the prawl of a factory stocked triplelock.

Bob

[This message has been edited by bfoster (edited 11-01-2003).]
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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When buying any 1911 (and that includes the Gold Cups) check the barrel to slide fit. That's the best indicator of it's potential accuracy. A well fitted bushing does alot to help accuracy, but if the barrel springs accurcy goes out the window.
Some Gold Cups have been known to shear it's rear sight pin, so that's something to look out for.
Another option is to hunt the used market for a National Match. They were very fine pistols also.
 

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quote:Originally posted by rcwambold:
I guess from many years ago, that a guy ought to have three pistols....

ONLY 3!!! Are you sure about that?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, Mr. Majic! I will do as you suggest. I'm sure I'd spring for the National Match over the current GC, but not likely to stumble across one out here in the hailstone and sasparilla belt! <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Majic:
When buying any 1911 (and that includes the Gold Cups) check the barrel to slide fit. That's the best indicator of it's potential accuracy. A well fitted bushing does alot to help accuracy, but if the barrel springs accurcy goes out the window.
Some Gold Cups have been known to shear it's rear sight pin, so that's something to look out for.
Another option is to hunt the used market for a National Match. They were very fine pistols also.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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Don't be discouraged. A pal of mine recently stumbled into a deal on a NM at a very small show. This pistol happens to be marked AS, probably indicating that it was set up by Armand Swenson.

Bob
 

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And THAT was HIS lucky day! I hope he got a lottery ticket on the way home from the gunshop! <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bfoster:
Don't be discouraged. A pal of mine recently stumbled into a deal on a NM at a very small show. This pistol happens to be marked AS, probably indicating that it was set up by Armand Swenson.

Bob
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 
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