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This is one of the Colt SAA holsters in the old Tandy/Al Stohlman holster making book which was very helpful to me and other gunleather fetishers. I liked that the muzzle peaked out a little on the bottom but still kept the front sight inside. I made it thirty years ago and made up my own tooling pattern. Bisley is a .44 Special, Remington repro .45 is long gone, but looked good in this holster.




 

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Very handsome. I've seen that particular muzzle treatment on only one other, a Hunter that is still sold today; and it's very plausible that they (or parent Colorado Saddlery, itself founded by Heiser people) supplied the bits n pieces for the kit itself.

Hunter was set up in 1952 to take over the gunleather portion of Colorado Saddlery's operations in Denver; which building still stands and is called The Saddlery; and contains a restaurant at the bottom level and apartments on the upper(s). It is directly across the street from Heiser's building (Heiser operated in many quarters over its 100 year history) which itself burned down at the turn of this century.

1952.PNG
 

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Very handsome. I've seen that particular muzzle treatment on only one other, a Hunter that is still sold today; and it's very plausible that they (or parent Colorado Saddlery, itself founded by Heiser people) supplied the bits n pieces for the kit itself.

Hunter was set up in 1952 to take over the gunleather portion of Colorado Saddlery's operations in Denver; which building still stands and is called The Saddlery; and contains a restaurant at the bottom level and apartments on the upper(s). It is directly across the street from Heiser's building (Heiser operated in many quarters over its 100 year history) which itself burned down at the turn of this century.

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I am curious about the muzzle exposure on some of these holsters. It seems to me an invitation to a plugged muzzle and a hung front sight when drawing. If the wearer of such an exposed muzzle rig sits or reclines on the ground, the pistol barrel is ground into the earth. Here in Western North Dakota and Eastern Montana, one sees a number of old, original holsters but seldom one with such an exposed muzzle. Most are closed toe holsters.
 

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Very nice job on that rig. When I read "Tandy Leather" it brought back memories of me teaching my scouts how to make knife sheaths in the old days.
 

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I have and still use that book along with others from that 70's era. I miss the Tandys of that time. Common and prices while not cheap were reasonable. Today they are hard to find, and unless you are a veteran or First Responder the price is much higher. Three tiers of prices are a little hard to handle. Rant over! I cut hardboard patterns from the book and modifiy as I need. Was never a carver but stamps can make for some good looking holsters.

Side note on the Bisley, I saw one identical to it as a gun show this past weekend. Had a 2rd gen barrel and cylinder on it and reblued. If the price was reasonable it might have come home with me. Looked to have the makings of a great shooter.
 

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I am curious about the muzzle exposure on some of these holsters. It seems to me an invitation to a plugged muzzle and a hung front sight when drawing. If the wearer of such an exposed muzzle rig sits or reclines on the ground, the pistol barrel is ground into the earth. Here in Western North Dakota and Eastern Montana, one sees a number of old, original holsters but seldom one with such an exposed muzzle. Most are closed toe holsters.
But you forgot one very important factor. Shane wore a holster with two inches of nickel plated barrel sticking out the bottom and it made me like the style ever since seeing that movie the first time when i was a kid, practical or not. I went hiking once packing this gun finding the site of an old stage coach/shootout hold up in the Sierras but used my full length holster. Here's how a SAA looks in it.

 

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But you forgot one very important factor. Shane wore a holster with two inches of nickel plated barrel sticking out the bottom and it made me like the style ever since seeing that movie the first time when i was a kid, practical or not. I went hiking once packing this gun finding the site of an old stage coach/shootout hold up in the Sierras but used my full length holster. Here's how a SAA looks in it.

And you're forgetting that Shane's revolver, in the book, has no front sight :). One of the ways the boy knows Shane is a real gunfighter.

Open and closed muzzles: the jury will always be out on which is better; they have long been made one way or the other. A closed muzzle will keep anything from going up into the bore, which is good. It will also trap everything that goes into the mouth of the holster; rain especially. An open muzzle is shorter which matters only when the holster is concealed, which many (most) are.

The most seminal holster design of them all, the style attributed to Brill because many have survived although he did not design it nor make the first of them, was made both ways; the open muzzle version being quite rare! It is the origin of the Threepersons design that shed the cuff and fender for simplicity's sake.

brill autos open and hole (1).jpg OPEN brill autos (14).jpg CLOSED
 
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