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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

For your review is my new (to me) Colt 1911a1. Picked it up last week from a private party in town, who also just picked it up himself
so I don’t know much about this Colt and was hoping you good folks might fill in some blanks. Based on the Serial Number it’s a 1943,
Slide is really tight, Sights are custom along with the Trigger Guard which is marked with 74, I thought this number was suppose to be the last 2 digits of my serial number
(which it isn’t) All other numbers match. I have some Ivory grips I’ll be throwing on.

Enjoy the photos and please feel free to comment!






 

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The 74 on the right side of the trigger guard is the identifying number of the Colt assembler. If the slide is numbered to the receiver it will be behind the firing pin stop plate, and it should be in that serial number range.
 

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On the right side of the slide forward of the frame is that just lighting in the pic, or has the slide been bevelled. Interesting piece, what makes you think it was customized way back when.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I say Way back... I mean the 70s'. Just because the Square trigger Guards were popular then. No the slide isnt beveled just lighting . I'll post more pics when I get her from the waiting period.
Yes the Slide is numbered with the serial number so those are a match. Other than that just glad its mine :)
 

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No the slide isnt beveled just lighting
Interesting... I was going to say that I find it fascinating that someone would do a (sort of attractive) stylized BHP cut on only the right side of the slide, and not the other. :rolleyes:

The (attributed to) Swenson influence was pretty pervasive back then. I must have seen hundreds of surplus guns through the 70s and 80s that had received the square (and sometimes hooked) trigger guard treatment... and done a few myself.
Have seen many "resurfacing" lately on forums... nice to see the old war horses coming out of the woodwork. Most find them ugly, but for me it's flashbacks to a fun and pleasant time in my life.

If it's not worn out, I'd wager it's a good shooter. :D

Cheers,
C
 

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Nice looking gun even though I am not a fan of square trigger guards. Give us some more pics when you get it and get the ivories on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll definitely put more pictures up when I get it on Thursday. I like the square trigger guard, it reminds me of something Shaft would carry or Starskey & Hutch. Yep Im a child of the 70's alright!
This does look along the lines of a Swenson but I could not find his Gardenia stamp anywhere. Its not a Swenson... just wishing it was. When I inspected it, was very well kept and as tight as my Kimber. + the numbers matched. Big question... whats it worth?
 

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The slide has been butchered, who would do that to just one side of the slide? The trigger guard welds are clearly visible and not blended......another example of a ruined GI pistol. This thing is like a pit bull with it's ear chewed off...lol...... What's it worth? I couldn't say......beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but I would run away from this one.
 

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I really like it. Especially if it was put together by someone you can pinpoint to in our state. I'd prefer dark aged stag, but I have a disdain for gold medallions. nice gun.
 

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I have a 1911 like this.... My dad was a NY cop from 65 to 81. During the 1970's he carried a 1918 vintage 1911 that he had smithed by a local gunsmith in NY. It has the standard round trigger guard, but the slide has been crushed and fitted, the stock trigger has been polished and smoothed out, it's been fitted with a long barrel link, and a NM barrel. Old school smithed 1911 are almost in a category by themselves. In a way they're a neat piece of history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Old school smithed 1911 are almost in a category by themselves. In a way they're a neat piece of history.
Agreed! They are almost like Folk Art. I dont know why all of you folks keep commenting about the slide. There is no modification done. Its all trickery of light I promise.
No beveling or butchering... I bet the person who owned this during the war, took it home; customized it and placed it in the safe where she sat until that person died... left it to their kid...
The kid sold it for quick cash to pay the rent . Then the guy who bought it from the kid gets in trouble with him wife because he brought home another 1911 so had to sell it within a month of buying it. Then I found it on Calguns. So thats the made up history on this piece and again... the slide has not been cut :)

Picked it up for $800 Fyi, thats what it was worth to the last owner... Its my first Colt 1911 hence priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
There she is, my first Colt 1911 home at last! Discovered a few things I didn't notice during the inspection.
The Safety has a proof mark. A "K" topped with a Crown! This is the King's Gun Works stamp from Glendale, Calif.
The owner who is no longer with us was a chap named "Al Capone" Im not making this up...

The Safety is from their shop that I know. the rest of the gun?? I will have to do my research. The Barrel is from a Mark IV Series 70.
Its a Franken Colt but I still love it!



 

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Al Capone was the owner of Kings for many years...depending on when the gun was built, it could be a gun that was assembled by Jim Hoag when he worked for Kings (late '60's). Nice pistola and a time machine into a different era of 1911s. If it's a Hoag gun (after he went out on his own), there'll be a "J HOAG" stamped inside the slide.
Bob
 

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Yes if it has the King's Crown logo on it I'd venture it was done by them, or as posted someone who worked there. Most of the modifications were very much in vogue back then.

My old Series 70 has one of their ambidextrous safeties in it and I do not think the safeties came with that logo on them. None of the pictures of the safeties in my older King's catalog shows the Crown on them.
 

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Good chance its a King's Gun Works gun, what with the marked safety, the square trigger guard, and the location. Probably a bit late for Hoag's time there. The barrel may've been put in to replace a pitted original. If the barrel is fitted to the gun, they could've just grabbed a take off barrel sitting around, while it was getting the other stuff done. If not, the owner may've just put it in. The rear sight looks familiar but I can't place it, is it marked?
Personally, I could do without the ivories and especially the pimped grip screws. I like nice ivories but not on such a gun. I don't think there's any gun I'd like gold grip screws on…! Its a cool gat, you should be proud. Shoot the snot out of it and enjoy it!
 

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The rear sight is a Micro sight.

While in today's market this might be considered a bubba-ed gun but back when this was probably done, the GI pistols were just another gun.
 
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