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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought one of these and could not be happier. It certainly doesn't have the gilt edge fitting and finish of an SAA but was never intended to. Mine has an excellent trigger, is very accurate, balances perfectly, and cost me less than half what an SAA would have. I keep hearing people talk it down and am baffled as to why.
Do others on the forum have experiance with the cowboy and do you like it. Just looking for some honest opinions here.
 

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I think the bad rap for the Cowboy had more to do with marketing than the actual quality of the gun. People were thinking that was going to be another SAA (which it wasn't intended to be). It was more intended to compete with Ruger. In my opinion Colt enthusiasts tend to be very particular about what we like, and SAA enthusiasts didn't like the Cowboy because it wasn't a 'real' SAA so it eventually vanished from poor sales.

I don't own one, but from what I understand they can be very good shooting revolvers.
 

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From what I understood they were good shooters and decent revolvers, but the Italian clones were cheaper and the Rugers were stronger. They fell in a niche all by themselves being not quite like anything else with poor sales.
 

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can you educate me on what a "real" SAA is as opposed to what the Colt Cowboy is or the Italian clones. what are the differences ?
 

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The Single Action Army is the Model P or the gun from 1873 with just a few minor changes that occured over the years. The Italian clones are somewhat close copies of the SAA with varying changes that the different manufactors may have added. The Cowboy was Colt building a cheaper revolver resembling the SAA with a action that's easier to produce.
 

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The main difference between a Cowboy and an SAA is the addition of the transfer bar safety, therefore the firing pin is in the frame on a Cowboy. While obviously safer, the Colt SAA purist probably considers the Cowboy an SAA derivative and not the real thing. From a distance, a quick way to tell the difference between the two is the gap between the trigger and the grip frame; the SAA trigger is right up close. I think this is due to the slightly different action design.
 

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I'm so behind that I didn't realize they'd been discontinued. The Cowboy didn't seem like a bad concept. Didn't it have "Cowboy" emblazoned on the side of the barrel. I don't care for junk markings like that. Whether it be "Cowboy", "Thunder Ranch", or some idiot wordy warning label it makes a gun look low class. The markings and model names should be more unobtrusive to the eye in my view. Smith & Wesson is also guilty of this.

Didn't intend to have a short rant there.

I was hoping that the Cowboy would be expanded to include different chamberings and barrel lengths.
 

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here is my Cowboy...

i gave $300.00 for it very slightly used...

you can see how it is marked in the 2nd picture...

david



 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As majic noted. Mine is a terriffic shooter. The case coloring has a somewhat different look to it. Not exactly sure how to describe it. The other steel parts have a somewhat plain but adequate blue. Royal Blue, it certainly is NOT. The rollmark on the side of the barrel is relatively small and unobtrusive. It reads: Colt Cowboy 45 Colt. The top of the barrel is marked COLT'S PT.F.A.MFG. Co Hartford Ct. U.S.A. The frame has the rampant colt on the left side just ahead of the two smaller screws. Except for the serial number there are no other externally visible marks on it. I bought mine with 4 3/4 barrel while a shooting buddy bought an identical one but with a 5 1/2 inch barrel. Very happy with mine. Plan on shooting it for many years.
 

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Ok, that's not as bad as I remembered. I was thinking Cowboy was in large letters.

The Cowboy looks quite presentable in the photo. If Colt had made one in .38-40 I would have taken most of the pressure off of firing my .38-40 SAA.

I'd also have purhcased one for $300 if I'd have run across it.
 

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ltdave's Cowboy looks really nice. I saw a couple nice nickel ones too.
The case hardened ones (most) just didn't look all that appealing. I don't know if it was the process or the frame material?
Colt had some good guns there at the end that should have been good sellers. (IMHO) Cowboy was one of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would like to see them reintroduce this model. I think given the way things are it might be successful.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
The case hardened ones (most) just didn't look all that appealing. I don't know if it was the process or the frame material?

[/ QUOTE ]

If I remember correctly it was a 'case-colored' finish on the Cowboy and not real casehardening.

One other note on the markings: The Cowboy did not have the patent dates stamped on the frame like the SAA.
 
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