Colt Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got several Officer Model match revolvers in .38 and .22. Have a Model "357" 4 inch, and a "second series" Detective Special made in mid-60s. I think they all have the same basic lockwork. I'm wondering--who designed this interesting V-spring DA lockwork? What year was it introduced? Did any other company use it, or a variant of it? And was there an particular reason it was chosen? I know the Colts were popular in Bullseye shooting because they are so easy to cock for single action firing. Was this lockwork chosen for that reason, back when DA firing was something of a novelty?Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,928 Posts
Interesting question and perhaps the real experts will be along shortly to give details.

I do know that I have a 1899 production Webley Mark IV .455 that features the V-Spring, similarly installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Excellent question. Most all my 1959-1979 Colt revolvers have the V-spring whereas my S&Ws have the screw spring and their action isn't bad either. Anxious to hear the pros weigh-in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,774 Posts
I have been looking for this information myself for quite while. I started a thread a few years ago on this question. I think the responses were that it was invented quite a while before Colt started using it. I dont think anyone here at the time,knew just who invented it or if anyone at Colt improved the basic design. I tried to find the old thread but couldnt.
I would also love to find any information on who invented the action with the V spring, rebound lever.and double stage hand, and what changes it may have gone through until Colt started using it.
Maybe someone out there will know the history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,412 Posts
The modern Colt DA (pre-1969) is usually described as a Schmidt-Galand action, of which there are many examples. The Galand action, as typified by the 1868 Galand for Russia, uses two separate springs instead of a V-spring, has a hammer system (powered by the mainspring) that looks a lot like the modern Colt, a rebound lever that is very similar to the Colt (powered by the mainspring auxiliary spring), trigger return via the rebound lever, and hand attached and moved by the trigger. One difference is that the cylinder locking bolt is a fixed protrusion on the trigger. All in all, this action is very similar to the modern Colt.

Schmidt made some modifications to the action for the 1878 Swiss Ordannanzrevolver, and many others have used variations of this action, now called the Schmidt-Galand. Major examples include:
  • The British Enfield and Webley revolvers.
  • The Swiss M1892.
  • The Colt 1889, 1892, 1894, 1896, 1901, 1903, and 1905 revolvers.
  • The 1898 Rast and Gasser revolver.
  • The V-spring (with the rebound lever as an integral part of the bottom leg) appears to have been first used in the 1878 Kaufman and Warnant revolver.
  • The V-spring with a separate rebound lever seems to have first appeared in the Webley MK. I.
The main thing that Colt added to their last version was the operation of the cylinder bolt using the rebound lever.

Buck
 

·
Forum Friend
Joined
·
5,858 Posts
Good info by haggis. The use of the V spring in guns goes back to the beginning, wheel locks, flint locks - and very likely earlier in other non-gun mechanisms. In a typical flint lock, one end of the spring is fixed while the other end does something like power the tumbler or sear.

Back down memory lane I seem to remember that Newton's 'first law of motion' was that "every action has an equal and opposite reaction" which means every spring has to push against something.

The V spring as used in Colts is an example of efficiency in which both ends of the V spring are doing something, one end the hammer, the other end the rebound lever, trigger, etc.

The wheel lock sear also uses both ends of a V spring. To handle the huge fully wound wheel forces - it has a V spring with one end pushing the latching element into position, with the other end setting the sear itself. Like the Colt, the elbow is not fixed to anything, just sits in a protected position.

Like many 'new ideas' there can often be found a precedent. Makes me wonder who started the old saying "there's nothing new under the sun".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,995 Posts
The Colt New Police 32 was manufactured in 1897 until 1908. The lockwork appears identical to the later V spring models with the exception of lacking the positive lock feature.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top