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What's the best way to insure a son or grandson gets your firearms, etc. when you pass on and not some inlaw or whoever? A lot of us are getting to that age that we need to think about that.

A will is often not worth the paper it's written on. Also, firearms could "disappear" (He must have sold them) etc.

While I hate the thought of passing on my firearms now, that's what I'm thinking I'll do.

What's your opinion on this matter? Have any of you made any plans concerning this?

Thanks
 

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I think I'd personally give the gun/s to them when I got old enough to not be able to use them.;)
Frank
 

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My guns don't appear in my will. I give some now to my Son and Son-in-law. Told my wife, when I croak, let each pick out six or ten each, her choice, then sell the rest if she wants - whatever - or give them all to above heirs. If wife goes first, my above heirs have access to my safes and will divide the up.
 

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Like Abe says -



Do it now, do it in writing also so the recipient has a nice 'Note' to keep and treaure also, affirming the gift and the date of the gift.

If the recipient is presently a minor, do the same but with someone trusted to act as escrow, to hang on to it till they come of age.
 

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If my wife dies first, then I will make specific arrangements for the sale of my guns to a dealer with the proceeds along with the rest of my estate to go to St. Jude Cancer Hospital for Children. If I go first, won't matter much, will it? She can do what she wants at that point.
 

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I've got a while to go before I have to worry about it, but I've been told a revocable living trust is a good option. It's the same trust you'd use to buy NFA goodies. Only people named in the trust would be able to get the firearms. I don't want to get too far out of my lane on that, so you might ask a lawyer who does NFA trusts for the details.
 

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IMHO you are wrong when you say a will is not worth the paper it is written on. If you are talking about something an individual writes on a piece of paper, calls it his/her last will and testament, signs it - you might be right. If however, you are talking about a document properly drafted by an attorney (and sometimes by an individual) in accordance with the laws of the State of residence of the individual, signed, with a witness and properly submitted for probate after death, if required, that will is an instrument of the court and is worth the paper it is written on. People have been using wills to determine how their property is distributed after death for hundreds of years and the courts uphold their wishes as put forth in the will.

I have seen significant estates (over a million dollars) that were distributed to the heirs, with what is called a simple last will and testament of three or four pages, and the last page was typically for signatures and witnesses.

Big difference between a homemade will and one that follows the laws of probate. Even with a homemade will, if it is properly drafted and the estate is not large or complex and the estate is not challendged, many courts will accept it for probate and follow the wishes of the decedent.

That said, you can generally have a local attorney draft a simple will for less than $1,000. Money well spent if you have an estate of any size or minor children.
 

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You can buy a printed form will at your local office supply store and fill it out as you like and get it witnessed or notarized at your bank. Cheap, probably effective and maybe better than no will at all.

Gun-wise, as well as other highly portable things like jewelry, there is always the possibility of a lot of 'slippage' in items missing, mis-idenitfied, substituted, etc. Also, if you are sensitive about gun registry, legal issues, etc., a will is the sure way to get it before the public, not to mention taxation. OTOH you won't be there to worry about it.
 
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