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My wife is really working hard on her photography hobby. She has taken a lot of photos
of my guns and I thought this one was exceptionally good. Any opinions,pointers for her?
Some of you take great photos so any advice would be appreciated.
 

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Great picture. Like the bowie. I'm having one made very similar. The guard will be slightly different. In fact, it reminded me to check with the guy making and mine will have slabs, I hoping. If it doesn't work out with the horn, a stick. Nice looking Colt, also.
 

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Try photographing on a solid blue or red background, as the nickel guns get "lost" with a background similar to yours. There have been several great posts by photogs much better than I, on excellent ways to photograph Colts. You can do a search on the Forum.

Enjoy
 

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I used to paint and learned some tricks about layouts for still-lifes. One thing I was taught is, the eye tends to follow straight lines. I'd say to make the beautiful SAA the focal point, maybe re-arrange the items to lead the viewer's eye to it. Contrasting colors are nice, then depth etc.. it's endless really but she is doing well! Just some things that came to mind and are offered with good intent. (great gun!)
 

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First, thanks for the picture. We can never get enough.

Since you asked for feedback, permit me to offer the following constructive criticisms:
- Get close to the subject, which presumably is the SAA. It only occupies a relatively tiny amount of the frame here, and thus is hard to appreciate.
- Feature the subject. As others have pointed out, there are too many other distractions in the photo, which cause the eye to keep wandering and not settle on anything in particular. This creates subtle discomfort in the viewer. It's OK to have other items present, but their placement, size or lighting should make them subsidiary to the subject.
- Lighting. Besides composition, the other thing that differentiates a good picture from a casual snapshot is getting the lighting right. This never happens by accident. For good photography, having the means to properly light the subject is often more important than having a good camera. Photography is all about capturing light, after all. In this case parts of the subject, the barrel for example, are dark and tend to blend into the background, which de-emphasizes the iconic shape of the SAA. Good lighting could also have been used to highlight the SAA, clearly identifying it as the subject (if done right).

Hope this helps. (By the way, I have posted a few pictures in other threads and they are nothing to brag about, mostly because I was in a rush and also lack good lighting equipment.)

One great thing about a good hobby, whether photography, shooting, or anything else, is how it allows a person to learn new things and practice them.
 

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Please take these comments as constructive criticsim, and offered to help; Fewer is better; the picture seems crowded and there are too many objects to draw the eye away from the gun, which I assume is supposed to be the focal point. Outside, shaded lighting is best for photographing guns, or a light box to diffuse the lighting, direct artificial lighting usually causes unwanted reflections.
Here's how different colored backgrounds can affect the same picture:




Here are some examples of different backgrounds, all pictures taken with natural outdoor light:







 
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