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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So on my way from home yesterday, I stop into a gun shop and I see two AR7's, both selling for the same price. One is a new Henry, and the other is an original Armalite... So I bought the Armalite for $289 out the door; I'm happy. I'm sure it will have feed issues, most AR7 mags suck but they can be fixed.

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I have an original Armalite AR-7...it is picky when it comes to magazines...only genuine Armalite mags work. I've not found any new magazines that will work...I had to send them back.

That being said...once you find a good mag, it's quite reliable and very accurate considering how basic the sights are.
 
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I am an ArmaLite fan. The REAL ArmaLite AR-7 uses a sleeved aluminum barrel, thus making it lighter than any of the clones that use all-steel barrels.

There are two versions of the genuine ArmaLite AR-7. The earlier style uses a fiberglass stock painted dark brown. The later version uses the swirl plastic stock like on DK's example. I have both versions as new in their original boxes.

I also have a "working" ArmaLite AR-7 that I sometimes take with me on a boat or ATV. I have several original magazines that all work fine. I also have a couple of old Ramline 25-round magazines that usually are reliable.
 

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I believe the Armalite in From Russia With Love is the scarce AR-5 which was a bolt action and chambered in .22 Hornet and designed as an Air Force survival rifle. It is misidentifed as .25 caliber in the film.
I did a lot of plinking with an original Costa Mesa AR-7 with the marbled stock back that belonged to a friend back in the early 1970's. I never remember it jamming. He kept it under the seat of his 1954 Dodge pickup.
 

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I believe the Armalite in From Russia With Love is the scarce AR-5 which was a bolt action and chambered in .22 Hornet and designed as an Air Force survival rifle. It is misidentifed as .25 caliber in the film.
I did a lot of plinking with an original Costa Mesa AR-7 with the marbled stock back that belonged to a friend back in the early 1970's. I never remember it jamming. He kept it under the seat of his 1954 Dodge pickup.
Check out the you tube video clip from "From Russia With Love" you will see its an AR-7. American Rifleman confirms this in their web article on the AR-7.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have an original Armalite AR-7...it is picky when it comes to magazines...only genuine Armalite mags work. I've not found any new magazines that will work...I had to send them back.

That being said...once you find a good mag, it's quite reliable and very accurate considering how basic the sights are.
Are the Armalite magazines marked in any way? I haven't seen an Armalite marked AR7 mag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am an ArmaLite fan. The REAL ArmaLite AR-7 uses a sleeved aluminum barrel, thus making it lighter than any of the clones that use all-steel barrels.

There are two versions of the genuine ArmaLite AR-7. The earlier style uses a fiberglass stock painted dark brown. The later version uses the swirl plastic stock like on DK's example. I have both versions as new in their original boxes.

I also have a "working" ArmaLite AR-7 that I sometimes take with me on a boat or ATV. I have several original magazines that all work fine. I also have a couple of old Ramline 25-round magazines that usually are reliable.
I'll have to really get a good look at it this weekend, but I'm pretty sure this one has an all steel barrel, but it's a Costa Mesa Armalite. Did Armalite make any with all steel barrels, or is it likely this has a replacement barrel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I believe the Armalite in From Russia With Love is the scarce AR-5 which was a bolt action and chambered in .22 Hornet and designed as an Air Force survival rifle. It is misidentifed as .25 caliber in the film.
I did a lot of plinking with an original Costa Mesa AR-7 with the marbled stock back that belonged to a friend back in the early 1970's. I never remember it jamming. He kept it under the seat of his 1954 Dodge pickup.
It's definitely an AR7, not an AR5.

The AR5 was part of the XB70 bomber program, and when that got canceled, the AR5 got canceled along with it. I don't think the AR5 ever made it out of the prototype stage. There's only a handful that were ever made for testing. I don't recall the number, but it was low double digits...probably less than 30.
 

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What are your guys thoughts on 22LR vs 22 Hornet for this application? I’d probably lean towards the Hornet.
 

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The Hornet would likely be more effective but far less available...even in today's ammo market.
 
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The military liked the .22 Hornet - the Survival Rifles in the ejection seats had them - mostly the M6 - the Armalite M5 didn't get much traction.

There are stories of a couple of SAC Commanders buying AR7s ILO the M6 using discretionary funds - they could use a commonly-found round for practice, and the M24 for a survival situation.

My own early Armalite AR7 came from a SAC bomber guy and I bought a number of spare magazines because they were common at that time.

This is one of those things that every outdoorsman should own.
 

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Good article from NRA American Riflemen Magazine 2016...covering some history and reviewing the Henry AR-7



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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
What are your guys thoughts on 22LR vs 22 Hornet for this application? I’d probably lean towards the Hornet.
I would prefer the .22LR. It will be much quieter, and it destroys less meat on small game. I would greatly prefer sub-sonic ammunition also. If you're behind enemy lines, quiet will become the most important feature.

These are wilderness survival small game rifles, that's it...they're all complete crap for defense.
 

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When WWII was going on, the standard survival rifle in the Pacific theater seat pack was the Stevens 20 guage/.22LR over-under with a Tenite stock.

That did well enough - though any information on actual use isn't exactly forthcoming.

They weren't issued in the ETO.

Post-WWII, the USAF came to be, and with it, the role of global intercession - 'that' meant flying over some rough country, rather than over someplace relatively civilized, and 'survival' was of prime importance - that was when the all-steel folding (or retractable stock) survival rifles (and some Colt 'Arctic Survival' Woodsman and High Standard pistols) found their way into the system.

The newly defined Air Force took the lead, since they were the ones doing the missions, and the other Services attached - using already-developed R&D started by the USAF.

The Army got involved, as well - they kept the liaison aircraft and spotters, since the DEW line was often their patrol area - as well as wartime Korea - neither area was hospitable - so the Army got some Woodsmans (25) from a USAF Contract that went to Springfield Ordnance District, and then on to the newly-formed Army Aviation branch.

They also got the steel survival rifles - made by both Ithaca and H&R - the idea was something to take down larger game - 'maybe' for self-defense - and that was pretty much it.

Later, they figured these weapons had more of a psychological value than a game-getting one, since aircrew retrieval became an art - and again, little information on actual use is sparse.
 
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