Colt Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I'm new here.
Just got my very first Colt and have some questions.
It is a Pocket Positive and it looks like it was made in 1920.
Here is a picture:

I'm not sure if it has a problem with timing. With the hammer fully drawn back the cylinder stop is just a hair from engagement, when the trigger is pulled the the cylinder moves the last little bit and is locked. I showed it to my smith, but he wasn'rt sure if it's a problem. Any ideas?
Thanks
Vit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
Welcome to the Forum,Vit. A very nice little Colt,and somewhat "rare" with that longer than "normal"(which was 2.5") barrel length.

The timing/lockup,is typical for older Colts. While not perfect,the cylinder remains locked in line with keeping pressure on the trigger after the hammer drops?

I have a couple of S&Ws of this vintage that have looser cylinder alignment; "non Colt knowledgable" S&W fans tend to exaggerate this on Colts. But,if cylinder has to move"a lot" to line up when trigger is pulled,problems,like bullet shaving and misfires will result.

Your gun looks very well preserved,for 85 years! Wonder if it spent most of its life in a desk,nightstand or desk drawer,ready to defend its owner/family??

You probably know that it fires the still produced .32 S&W Long ammunition.

A nice find,Vit! Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Bud!
I took the side plate off and it looks like it is supposed to be like that. The last little bit of trigger movement moves the cylinder in place wher it is locked.
All info on this little gun would be appreciated. Do any parts interchange with any other models? I would like to replace the screws if possible as the original ones are lightly "buggered". Is there a larger grip available for this gun? I would like to have something different as I would like to fire it occasionally and would like something a little more comfortable and would keep the original grips from possible damage.
Any good history on these?
Thanks
Vit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Numrich has a few different grips listed for the Pocket Positive, but there are no pictures or good descriptions...
They have a replacement hand too, do I need it?
Vit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
Not sure,Vit, but I think that the Pocket Positive had its own unique grip frame(shorter,for better concealment),and thus you can't put the larger Police Positive grips on it.

As far as a replacement hand(help me out please on this one dfarriswheel!)it would NOT be a "slip in" replacement,as Colts,as do most quality made revolvers,require hand fitting to make them function correctly/smootly. From your "diagnosis",gun seems safe to shoot occassionally,with standard .32 velocity ammo.

Perhaps one of the aftermarket grip makers,such as Franzite(probably) or Jay Scott(doubtful) from the past made replacement,or even oversize stocks(grips) for the Pocket Positive. They will most likely be fake ivory or pearl,in "plastic". Lot of these older aftermarket stocks show up on eBay! Good Luck. Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The gun is difficult to hang onto with just two sweaty fingers. 4" @ 15 yards.
I need a slightly bigger grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
Vit;Great to hear that you've tried the Pocket Positive out! There are some of us,that do like to "relive history",and as a history instructor for nearly 40 years,this is a way I can do it! I tried to get into the "cap and ball,black powder scene",to even 'go further back,but just never got into it! Sort of like driving a friends' chain drive Mack Bulldog,circa 1923(what an upper body work out!!),compared to driving a "horse and wagon".

Anyway,I checked some older catalogs to see if Jay Scott(they made Pocket Positive grips from 4 materials) listed any oversize-NO.

The Pocket Positive has a unique D frame ,not common with the others. So other than taking a set of Police Positive wood grips,and "reworking them,I dunno!

I do not have any Pocket Positives(nearly bought a nice one about 20 years ago(that had spent its 70 years in a rich family's desk),but thought price was too high back then.

I have the modern Colt equivalent to the Pocket Positive,the Courier,less than 3000 made around 1954 or so. This was the first "modern Colt" to use a short butt frame-and short grips! My Courier is a .32,and one with even an alloy cylinder,besides the frame. Less were made in .22;all had 3" bbls. Weight is 13 oz!! Less than even the 2.5" Pocket Positive,so you have to use a different technique,with those fingers beneath the grip!!! With a steel cylinder in "mine",well my wife carried it for years,in a "fanny pak"-she now has moved up to a larger 2" Colt O.Police(no comments on a larger fanny pack due to a larger fanny!!!!),recoil with .32 handloads is stout,but not as bad as the "original" Agent,a .38 Special,with this shorter butt,that came out a year or so,after the Courier.

Then Colt,around 1966(?) decided to make all D frames with this short grip frame,and put extension stocks,with wood beneath the grip frame. Basically,this is what you need,but these late model grip stocks,won't fit the unique Pocket Positve grip frame without a little reworking. Again,if I had a Pocket Positive,I'd see what could be done,by comparing the frame with some extension stocks from a 1972 .22 Cobra I have.

One thing that might help "the control",is a grip adapter,such as a Tyler or Pachmayer-Mershon that is for an old style D frame. This will give more control,and stop your knuckles from being smashed by the rear of the trigger guard,a common problem with D frames.

I have a small hand,short fingers,but very wide,so depending on your hand size,things vary. Keep in mind,the older pocket revolvers,all brands,top breaks,"suicide specials",etc. had grips not really designed for comfort,but concealment-they also were much milder in recoil,than this age of 16 oz. .357 magnum.

Sorry for the "windy post",and wish I could help you find more user friendly stocks(grips). Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys!
The timing is fine, had no problems shooting it.
Bud,
All my guns are shooters, I will not own a gun if I can't enjoy it. Just the way I am.
Vit
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
sirs,i am new here and really enjoy this site. very impressed by the knowledge here. i will add a little bit to the subject of cyl. timing on pre 69 style colt actions. to correctly check timing slowly s/a cock the EMPTY revolver. repeat this for all six chambers. properly timed the hand will rotate the cyl to lock each and every time, you can not cycle the action too slowly if the hand length is correct. there can be several reasons that the gun fails this test, the most common are powder residue or dried lube ect. retarding the rotation, or a hand that has seated over time with firing. the hand does act as a lock and will rotate the cly. hard against the bolt at the instant of firing and hence the very tight lock up colts are famous for. the hand being held tight against the ratchet at the instant of recoil recieves a slight impulse from the larger and heavier cyl. and over time is seated. the hand may be stretched up to .010 on a 1 time basis by a competent gunsmith.i would suggest jerry kuhnhausen`s excellent book {the colt double action revolvers a shop manual vol. 1} should you wish more info. regards dux
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I am not an expert on this subject, but I believe that in a Colt, the hand is part of the locking process. This is why a properly timed Colt can be tight on all cylinders with the hammer down, which is rather unusual with an S&W. I am pretty sure that the proper check for a Colt is really the same as an S&W - in DA mode. Trigger-cocking very slowly, the cylinder stop should engage the slot in the cylinder before the hammer drops. If it passes that test, and doesn't spit or shave or hit off-center, I wouldn't worry about it.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top