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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All I am a long time lurker that just signed up for the forum. I am wondering if anyone can help with the value of the revolvers that I have, since it seems like I cannot pinpoint an exact Value. I inherited these from my grandfather, who got them from his dad who was the original owner.
The first pistol is a Police Positive 32 Police CTG serial number is 185633 which dates to 1922 .



The second is a Trooper .357 Magnum CTG serial number 76429 which dates to 1968 if I am correct.



Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,
bryan
 

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Hi ! Both of those appear to be in pretty good shape. Clearer and closer pictures would help. But from what I see I'd say $350.00 to $450.00 on the Police Positive and $450.00 to $550.00 on the Trooper. Thats just my opinion and others may vary !! LOL
The .32 new police should shoot the .32 S&W Long.
 

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$350-400 for the small frame 32 and $600 for the .357 trooper. list them here and they should sell soon. good luck.

I am going to add the myself and broknaxl replied within 1 minute of each other with about the same price. His posting about better pics is needed especially with the trooper as if it has finish wear on the barrel it will drop the price. If you search this forum someone else just posted his new purchase of a trooper with the box and paperwork that he bought for $600. The box and paperwork easily added $100 to the value of the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, the finish on both of them is original and in very good shape. They are both original and I do plan on selling these to fund a glock for the police academy. Do not have paperwork or boxes for either though. The police positive is a little gunked up where the cylinder opens(the hinge) any idea how to clean this??
 

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When we are young, we often do not appreciate the value of family heirlooms. If you must have a Glock, buy a used one to get you through training, then buy a new one once you start getting paid. Borrow the money if you must, but keep those family heirlooms.
 

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I fully agree with the above 2 posts. The 32 is a excellent ladies training gun or those that are recoil sensitive and can hide in a sock drawer for home defense. The early trooper .357 is a plainer version of the Python with the same action and of course you can shoot milder common 38 special ammo in it. Besides, what department doesn't give you an allowance for weapons purchase? Any way to "borrow" a glock for training? Down the road you may likely be one of those person's who may regret selling such fine firearms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They were my great grandfathers who gave them to my grandfather. I also got my grandfathers 38 special which he used as a cop that I am going to keep since that was actually his. I really have no attachment to these two as I did not know my great grandfather. What is the point in keeping these if they will just sit in a case hidden and never get used. I should just sell them to someone who gets more enjoyment out of them right? I understand where your coming from though.
-bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I agree with them too just don't really have the attachment to these as I do to my grandfathers actual gun. Most departments down here just give you the choice of a gun when you start(glock 22 or 23). They let you "use" a gun at the academy where I am going on the days you have to shoot, but I want to be able to practice on my own.
 

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I have two of my grandfather's rifles.
I'd trade my truck for any of my great-grandfathers' guns.

Never knew them, but those would be extremely cherished heirlooms, if they'd come down to me.
Selling such things is very hard for many of us to understand.
Denis
 

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but I want to be able to practice on my own.[/QUOTE] take the trooper and buy some 38 special bulk ammo for practice. Shoot the gun only with double action trigger pull (do not cock the gun as in single action trigger pull) and you will almost become familiar to the glock trigger.
 

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Man, I was trying hard not to say it, but selling off two fine old Colts like those, and family heirlooms to boot, for a Glock, is...is...nope, I'd better not say it after all. :)
Denis
 

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I see your side of things...

I sold one of my grandfather's shotguns and used it to buy something that I enjoy and reminded me of him. I don't regret it. It made it easier that it was low value shotgun that meant little or nothing to him and I had no sentimental attachment to it, and no shared memories surrounding it. And truth be told, if no one ever sold off their family members guns, many people on this forum would not have the collection they have today.

BUT I also see the other guys side of things to...


I realize all of your new coworkers and people you hang out with are probably talking Glockese and Springfieldish. But Glocks are a dime a dozen. Ten years from now you will be bored with Glocks because everyone you know will carry and shoot one. The Colts will be interesting because they have history and are just plain cool. They represent craftsmanship of a time gone by.

Sorry that we have spent more time talking about selling vs non selling but I think so many here have had the experience of wishing they had not sold off a family member's gun that it is hard not to chime in. I wish I had some Colts from my grandparents. Nothing beats a Colt with personal history!
 

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Most people do not know their great-grandfathers. (I did not even know any grandparent, because they were all dead before I was born.) That does not remove the irreplaceable family connection. (I cherish my fraternal grandfather's L. C. Smith shotgun.) We "old dogs" are trying to advise a young person on what is important even if the young person does not realize it.

Most of my guns "sit in a case hidden and never get used," but that does not reduce their value to me. My guns with a family connection are not my most valuable, but they are priceless.

Surely, someone here has a Glock he can loan to our new young friend to get him through the academy until he can get a few paychecks and buy his own without selling his family heirlooms. We need a volunteer. Or fifty of us could give our young friend a ten dollar bill. I am in for that. Anyone else?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
lol you guys are hilarious, this reminds me of my corvette forum family and my old s2000 forum! I see where you all are coming from and I understand your frustration as you all are revolver fanatics. Thank you all for the advice.
 

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I'm new to the forum (ignore the date). Where are you located? I'd gladly bring you my Brother-in-law's Glock (he can't shoot it anyway, he sucks with them) and trade you for the PPS.

I would hate to see you trade/sell it away.

Aloha,
Doug
 

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Well, no. It's not a matter of being revolver fanatics.
It's a matter of trading off two fine examples of classic guns that display what's becoming a lost art of quality craftsmanship from the days when talented and experienced hands built finely-fitted and finished steel and wood guns, and with the added bonus of family lineage, for an inexpensive mass-produced pistol with molded plastic, stamped parts, and CNC'd slide that you yourself could assemble with 20 minutes of instruction from a bag of loose pieces.

Craftsmanship, pride (in both the maker and the owner), classic designs, and family history mean nothing to many people. You are unfortunately one of those.
And to most of us here, including those like me who own five Glocks & HAVE carried them in uniform, it has nothing to do with being "revolver fanatics" & everything to do with appreciation of the classics multiplied by a strong sense of family lineage, whether we knew Great-Grandpa or not.

Sad that you don't see this, sadder still that you find those who do "hilarious".
Enjoy your Glock. As you say- better to put those Colts into the hands of someone who will truly appreciate them.
Denis
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well, no. It's not a matter of being revolver fanatics.
It's a matter of trading off two fine examples of classic guns that display what's becoming a lost art of quality craftsmanship from the days when talented and experienced hands built finely-fitted and finished steel and wood guns, and with the added bonus of family lineage, for an inexpensive mass-produced pistol with molded plastic, stamped parts, and CNC'd slide that you yourself could assemble with 20 minutes of instruction from a bag of loose pieces.

Craftsmanship, pride (in both the maker and the owner), classic designs, and family history mean nothing to many people. You are unfortunately one of those.
And to most of us here, including those like me who own five Glocks & HAVE carried them in uniform, it has nothing to do with being "revolver fanatics" & everything to do with appreciation of the classics multiplied by a strong sense of family lineage, whether we knew Great-Grandpa or not.

Sad that you don't see this, sadder still that you find those who do "hilarious".
Enjoy your Glock. As you say- better to put those Colts into the hands of someone who will truly appreciate them.
Denis
woo maybe we got off on the wrong foot sir, let me introduce myself.
Hell my name is Bryan LoBianco and yes I am new to this forum.
What I said in my last comment "lol you guys are hilarious, this reminds me of my corvette forum Family and my old s2000 forum! I see where you all are coming from and I understand your frustration as you all are revolver fanatics. Thank you all for the advice" When I used the word you guys are hilarious I was referring to some of you actually being funny for instance, eagleeye said he wanted to start a charity for me in order to keep the family guns. I thought that was very thoughtful and made me laugh at the idea. I also would not have said you guys remind me of my corvette Family if I was trying to belittle anyone I would not have used this word. Sorry If my statement got confused for a rude one as it was not intended that way.
thanks,
bryan
 
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