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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently responded to a post with regards to the Smith and Wesson Model 1 1/2 'Transitional Model' revolver, and here is what I wrote:

"What has always amazed me about the 'Transitional Model' is the hefty premium that is placed on one relative to the first model and second model (that is, about three or four times the price of the other models). Granted, there were probably less than a thousand produced and the survival rate would be much less. However, what immediately comes to mind when one discusses using newly found parts in a current production firearm is the 'Long-Fluted' Colt Single Action Army that was produced from 1913 to 1915. In 1905, Colt had discontinued their Colt 1878 Double Action revolver and had approximately 1500 cylinders left over. They elected to utilize them in their infamous Single Action Army revolver. I realize that probably close to twice the number of Long-Fluted Colt revolvers were produced, as compared to the Transitional Model, and the survival rate of the Long-Fluted Colt would likely be far greater than the Transitional Model, as the Long-Fluted Model was produced about 50 years after the Transitional Model. I really like these old 1 1/2's, but I don't think anyone would argue with me that when it comes to antique firearms, the Single Action Army has a much greater following, collector base, value, etc., etc., than does the Smith and Wesson Model 1 1/2. Yet, having noted all of the above, despite the infinitely greater popularity of the Colt Single Action Army, a Long-Fluted Model only brings a 5 to 10 % premium over a comparable revolver produced in the 1913 to 1915 era. Without a doubt, the Transitional Model should bring a premium, and maybe greater than the 5 or 10% premium the Long-Fluted Model brings compared to its contemporaries, due to greater rarity, but is the three-fold or four-fold premium of the Transitional Model relative to its contemporaries justifiable or even sustainable? Just my observations..."

Here is the link, for further reference:

Smith & Wesson 1 1/2 Transition Model Revolver

So, then, why is it that the Long-Fluted Model brings such an inconsequential premium relative to its contemporaries when other early firearms, such as the Smith & Wesson Transitional Model, which are far less legendary than the Colt Single Action Army revolver?????
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In my area the Long Flute commands more of a premium than 5-10%. I would say 25-40% premium. You guys in Texas just have too many SAA's!
I was just going by what the 'Blue Book' stated. I know values are way off in this book, but I would have thought they would have been a lot closer with regards to percentage premium. BTW, I am in the Land of High Taxes, not Texas. That would be Pennsylvania.
 

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mrcvs, Sorry for reading your location wrong. You are probably like me, you wish you lived in Texas. BTW, I would have guessed Massachusetts as the land of High Taxes.
There are lots of problems with the BlueBook. When it first came out, the author would monitor sales at gunshows and any other sales he could find. That was before the days of the internet. I have no idea how he sets his values these days, but I find the BlueBook to not be as useful as it once was on many collectable firearms. To me having a 2-3 year old BlueBook is adequate most of the time.
Think about how many million BlueBooks have been sold and the profit that has accrued from those book sales.
 

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I believe they do letter. One would have to cut notches in the 1878 cylinders to make them work in a SAA, but it could be done, I guess. BTW, there are many 1878's that were stripped of their barrels and ejector rods so that SAA's could have new lives (barrels).
 

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Do long flutes letter as long flutes? If they do not it would concern me knowing that so many busted 1878s are lying around. It would not be that hard to make fakes if the premium is too high.
Yes, there is a note at the bottom of the letter stating such. Mine was shipped to "The Adjutant General of the State of Texas".
I paid $1500 for it, but it had been converted from 45 Colt to 357 Mag by lining the original bbl & cyl. and been reblued fully. It is presently in Dave Lanara's hands to be restored to original configuration and finish.

 
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Years ago, I had one, sold it to a American dealer. Beside the long flutes, the polish was exeptionally fine , the blue was deeper compared to a normal SAA. I think the premium can reach 50%.
 

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The current letters include "furnished with double action cylinder" notation or something to that effect, but the truth is that as far as I know unless a gun has been altered every single action from the serial number 330,000 to 331,480 will have a long flute cylinder. That is what keeps folks from altering other serial ranges and making themselves a long flute variation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The current letters include "furnished with double action cylinder" notation or something to that effect, but the truth is that as far as I know unless a gun has been altered every single action from the serial number 330,000 to 331,480 will have a long flute cylinder. That is what keeps folks from altering other serial ranges and making themselves a long flute variation.
Oh, it is precisely every gun in that serial number range. I did not realise it was every one in that range. I know that Man at Arms once featured an article on 'out of range' Long-fluted Colts. One of them was number 329983, and it was manufactured 30 June 1915 and shipped 03 September 1915. It has a 7 1/2 inch barrel. I know, because I wrote down all this information, as I saw this gun personally, maybe 10 or 15 yrs ago. I think the price was $3,500 or $4,000. I seem to think he had $4,000 on it and would take $3500. I thought, at the time, it seemed like a lot for this firearm, that was in maybe 70 or 80% condition. He said there was a premium as it was featured in the Man at Arms catalogue, and was once owned by Graham, Kopec, or Moore. I forget which one owned it. The price seemed steep at the time, but I think he sold it fairly quickly, so maybe not???
 

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Oh, it is precisely every gun in that serial number range. I did not realise it was every one in that range. I know that Man at Arms once featured an article on 'out of range' Long-fluted Colts. One of them was number 329983, and it was manufactured 30 June 1915 and shipped 03 September 1915. It has a 7 1/2 inch barrel. I know, because I wrote down all this information, as I saw this gun personally, maybe 10 or 15 yrs ago. I think the price was $3,500 or $4,000. I seem to think he had $4,000 on it and would take $3500. I thought, at the time, it seemed like a lot for this firearm, that was in maybe 70 or 80% condition. He said there was a premium as it was featured in the Man at Arms catalogue, and was once owned by Graham, Kopec, or Moore. I forget which one owned it. The price seemed steep at the time, but I think he sold it fairly quickly, so maybe not???
I once owned that Long Flute. It came from the collection of Bill Dascher of Virginia Beach. I traded it off and I think a dealer from Roanoke, VA area sold it for a friend of mine. I believe he said it went to someone in PA or MD.
I wish I had kept it!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I once owned that Long Flute. It came from the collection of Bill Dascher of Virginia Beach. I traded it off and I think a dealer from Roanoke, VA area sold it for a friend of mine. I believe he said it went to someone in PA or MD.
I wish I had kept it!!
What do you think that gun would be worth today? I keep on hoping I will run across it again someday, but, so far, no luck! So Bill Dascher had it and then you got it, traded it to a friend, who sold it in Roanoke? I lived in Blacksburg, Virginia for many years...so close to where it was probably about that time frame.
 

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What do you think that gun would be worth today? I keep on hoping I will run across it again someday, but, so far, no luck! So Bill Dascher had it and then you got it, traded it to a friend, who sold it in Roanoke? I lived in Blacksburg, Virginia for many years...so close to where it was probably about that time frame.
It is a small World. As with most very collectable guns, they can 'float around' for a while until some very serious collector 'squirrels them away' for the rest of his life. This one will probably only show up again when that collector passes away or needs money for a retirement home.
 

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I've heard about those "out of range" long flutes and I guess anything is possible if colt had some 78 cylinders laying around but I wonder if there are any notations in the shipping records on the "out of range" ones about "furnished with double action cylinder" as the ones in the known range are generally lettered say so.
 
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