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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I went to go shoot and I put a magazine in and chambered a round, it started to pour rain and I decided to unload the gun. I released the magazine, took it out and now I cannot pull the slide back to clear the round out of the chamber. The slide will only move back about an eigth of an inch and no further. Does anyone have an idea what could have happened or why the slide will not pull back and eject the round ? Coulkd it be the round is stuck in the chamber ? It is a reload that is in the chamber.

My son stopped over and he pulled the slide back and the stuck round popped right out. Embarrassing, I guess he is much stronger than I am lol
 

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Not an infrequent occurence. In a "safe" environment, finger off the trigger, press the slide/spring plug against a sold surface, allowing the slide to retract and the barrel to move forward in the bushing. The jam should clear.Alternative is to grip the slide firmly with your left hand, muzzle pointed safely. With your right hand slap the grip backstrap hard with the web of your hand as if you were trying to grab the weapon. A couple of "grabs" should clear the weapon. Got to be a little careful on this one as I wittnessed an AD when the owner slapped the backstrap, the jam broke free and the slide/extractor carried the live round back hitting the primer on the ejector. This was a .38S and don't know if the geometry of a .45acp would allow the same kind of accident. Just sayin'.
 

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It is very possible that the round is stuck in the chamber....more so because it is a reload. If the round was not gage or barrel checked after it was reloaded...it might be slightly bulged at the base or the overall length is too long and the bullet is already into the barrel rifling causing a tight fit. Don't panic but above all else...remember that you have a live round in the chamber as you try to dislodge it. The best thing to do if you are not experienced with this situation or comfortable trying to resolve this is to take it to a qualified gunsmith. Home remedy is to get you some good work gloves and grab the slide for all it's worth trying to pull it back like normal and hope you can apply enough force to extract the round from the chamber. Again....remember to keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction as it's easy to forget the gun is loaded when you are focusing on extracting this stuck round.

If you can determine the exact problem by examining/measuring the other rounds that I will assume were made at the same time and you can determine that the case is slightly bulged....wait for the gasp.....you can always fire the round and that will make it easier to extract the spent brass if it doesn't come out on it's own. If you determine that the AOL has been exceeded....do not fire the round as the pressures will be higher than expected and the gun could possibly be damaged.

Good luck and if you reloaded these rounds...remember to gage check everything you reload....it takes more time but will save you time in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the replies.
I found the case had a slight bulge right below where the bulle base is seated. Could this be from too much taper crimp or not enough ?
What else could case bulge ?
Oh yes I checked OAL with my caliper and it is good.
 

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My .45acp loads typically look "lumpy" after seating the bullet. Whether the bullet goes into the case slightly cockeyed causing the case distortion, I don't know, but as long as the loaded cases drop into the cartridge gage, they're usable as far as I'm concerned.In my experience, the cause(s) for rounds not going easily into the cartridge gage has been either tiny slivers of lead or copper (in the case of plated bullets) smeared down the outside of the case OR burrs raised on the cartridge rim by the extraction process of the last cycle of the gun.
 
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