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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of weeks ago I bought a used King Cobra from a local shop with their own range. I was pretty happy with my find, it has a 2.5" barrel, looks pretty clean and didn't appear to have been fired much.

The owner of the shop talked like he knew the seller and offered to let me shoot the Colt on his range before buying. I asked if he knew of any problems and he said no. I locked up the action and checked the cylinder for play and it seemed pretty tight.

I went back a week later to pick it up. My Dad and I took it out to their range to check it out. I shot about a dozen rounds of .38s with no problem. Then I loaded up some .357s, again it shot fine.

My Dad (85) then tried it. I loaded up some .38s for him. He went to fire and the gun locked up. The trigger was partially depressed, the hammer back slightly, but neither would budge. We unlocked the cylinder, everything operated normally.

I thought it was a fluke and we went ahead and completed the sale. The last words of the shop owner as we left was that he was sure we would like it, and that he had worked on the action himself.

A few days later, I took the Colt to a local range at lunch and ran about 30 rounds through it with no problem. After firing another 6 rounds, I went to pull the trigger again, on a fired cartridge, and it locked up again. The trigger felt very heavy, like I might be able to force it, the hammer wouldn't budge. I unlocked the cylinder and everything was all right.

I haven't been able to duplicate the problem again. I've dry-fired with snap caps a few hundred times. I like this gun and will probably keep it, I'd like it to be reliable.

I'll be going back to the range probably tomorrow to see if it will act up again. I want to keep this snubby and am hoping the solution is something simple, or at least not too expensive to fix.

I'm hoping one of you might give me some insight to what's going and give me suggestions to take to a gunsmith.
 

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If you can unlock the cylinder and everything works fine and dryfire with snap caps and everything works fine, it sounds to me that you have an ammo problem. Firing the second time on a fired casing and you have the problem sounds a little bit like primer flow.
Check out the ammo you are using, especially if you are using reloads.

------------------
Dick

There is a word sweeter than mother, home or heaven--
That word is Liberty.

[This message has been edited by diamonback68 (edited 05-10-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the tip.

I'd been shooting some 'remanufactured' ammo I had gotten at the gunshow. I've had good luck with it in other guns/calibers.

The .357 rounds I was putting through it were factory new, but I didn't have the problem with those.

FWIW, I had forgotten to mention earlier, there was no spitting of lead, etc indicative of a timing problem.

I have not measured the gap between the forcing cone/cylinder, but the last time it locked up, I could still see daylight.
 

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While checking for primer flow also check the recoil plate for bits of primer metal that may shear off in the firing pin hole
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have to admit my ignorance, I'm not familiar with the term "primer flow".

I did check for high primers after the last problem, but all seemed to be well seated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
FWIW, I went back to the range at lunch today. I shot 50 more rounds with no problems.

These were 158gr hollow points, the originals that gave me problems were 158gr FMJ.

A buddy at the range explained primer flow to me.
 
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