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All of you guys with a bit of age on you...do you ever wonder what the hell happened while you were growing up? Remember when you could buy a quart of re-conditioned oil for twenty-five cents? Gas was thirty-two cents a gallon? A six-pack of "Mabel" Black Label was under a buck? Five dollars would get you cruising gas, a pack of smokes, a six-pack, a pint of Cherry Vodka, and breakfast at the truck stop at three-o-clock in the morning?
I bought a perfectly serviceable '56 Buick for a hundred and twenty-five bucks which I drove for two years and only had to pull a head and replace one burnt valve.
You could actually afford to eat beef...
How do you guys handle the changes you've seen through out your lifetimes?

I know this is a gun forum, so I'll throw this in (it's not a Uberti)...
Rig.jpg
 

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Yeahhh...it bums me out all the time..!

Or, part of what bums me out, is the ever widening gap betwen income from reasonable skill and effort, and what everything worth having, costs now.

Takes a lot of ingenuity to make things work now...where, in the 1960s, anyone with a Paper Route or other humble Job, could generally afford a decent-enough house in a nice-enough neighborhood, a good used Car, and, have all the Groceries them and their family needed.

By the time I was 14 I could have been supporting the average family of 'four' ( or even six ) at that time, just by my doing part time Painting and Roofing and Siding or Carpentry Gigs like I was doing.

Nice smaller Houses in San Francisco or on the Coast, could be had for around ten grand...Gasolene once I was driving, was 22 Cents a Gallon, good used Cars, $150 to $200 would give you HUGE numbers of them to choose from, of get in and GO ones...clean garage kept ones. Carton of Lucky Strike or Pall Mall was $2.50 or so ( $2.75 by the early mid 1970s )...it was very possible for a family to have a very decent quality of Life, with only one member of the family working, which of course, was usually the dad.


My parents entire overhead per month, Mortgauge, Power Bill, 'phone Bill, Car insurance, Groceries, Gas and Cigarettes and Coffee and so on, was about $250.00 a Month, if that, and we had a nice moderatley large Home with a two Car garage and Basement, two Cars ( three if we count mine ) which House they had bought for 21 thousand ( I think) in 1966 in a very nice neighborhood that had no crime, no home break ins, no burglaries and no 'diversity' and 100 percent nice, decent neighbors.

I was making probably $350.00 to even $450.00 a month in my mid teens ( latter 1960s ), just doing various part time (or less than full time anyway ) gigs and learning things BY doing, about the Building Trades. I cut school constantly to be out in the World instead, doing things which were fun, educational, and which payed!

I feel so sorry for teenagers now...eeeeeesh...

But anyway...

...sigh...

Average nce condition SAA then was around a Hundred Bucks if memory serve...and a minty 1st Generation one might have bene twice that I s'pose.

Wish I had known more about old Guns then, I would have worked TWICE as hard and TWICE as long, and been buying them!
 

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What happen when I was growing up late 1930s? Not much. Name brand oil was 30 cents and reclaimed was nickel. I pumped a lot of gas at 12 1/2 cents and 15 for Ethyl. A dollar would buy a quart fruit jar of 'white lightnin' so the big boys told me. Five would buy a pretty good SAA Colt or 1911. A Model T Ford that might get you home $15, a Model A $25.

Handle the changes? Some I'm thankful for, some not. Then a car with 25000 miles on it needed or was in its replacement set of tires, brakes, exhaust system, valve job, piston rings, etc. Today forget it for 100K. Price of gas hasn't changed much, then kid wages 25 cents/hr and 12.5 cent gas equals two gals per hour, today $3.50 gas and minimum wage, same two gal/hr.

We kids learned about where we came from by listening to the old folks recollect their earlier lives and what they heard at the knees of their grandparents. Gone now in this electronic age.

Here is one of those $5 1911s, the only one I have dating back in the day. My cousin had it, a ranch gun, functional but that was about all. I bought it from his estate $140 about 10 years ago and dolled it up a bit.
 

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...How do you guys handle the changes you've seen through out your lifetimes? ....
I don't know if I am "handling it"...Coping might be a better word, but still not sure.

Shell Gas stations use to have a contest where you would tear and peal open a handout. It would reveal if you won a $ amount of gas. I use to supplement my gas allotment during the mid 1960's when I needed gas money for work. Gas wars; I can remember paying 19 cents a gallon, a a Very Polpular Gun Store in Culver City California had barrels of War Surplus rifles; your choice $5.00!.

I could cruise Hollywood and Sunset Blvd's, have a 6 pack of Budweiser on $5.00. Now you're lucky to get 100 primers for the same $5.00, and there isn't enough change to get soda or a beer.

I have probably gone through several fortunes in Guns, Women, Cars and booze. The only ones I don't regret are the Guns and Cars.

I always said if I was going to be a millionaire makes sure it's at least a $1,000,010.00..That way I could go to McDonalds for lunch and still be a millionaire!:rolleyes:
 

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Do miss those late night meals at the Hollywood Diner (on Long Island) Remember passing on worn out Shelby Cobra race car for $1800 in 1973, not so long ago. Really though, everything is relative, OP talking about changes, for sure miss the people who were in my life who are now gone.
 

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My Dads first car was a 1930 Graham Paige that he bought for $25. I think he bought a 46 Chevy after that for about the same money.

I do miss Black Label beer. Used to be able to buy it in Maine but not anymore. I think there are only about 16 states they still sell it in.
We also used to buy Tuborg beer back in the '80s. It was $3.99 for 12 bar bottles.
 

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Do miss those late night meals at the Hollywood Diner (on Long Island) Remember passing on worn out Shelby Cobra race car for $1800 in 1973, not so long ago. Really though, everything is relative, OP talking about changes, for sure miss the people who were in my life who are now gone.
Where did you live on Long Island? That's where I grew up. Where was the Hollywood Diner? We lived about 5 minutes from Lido Beach. When I got old enough I was a life guard at the public beaches. I'm only 60 and I wasn't driving until about 1967 but I remember gas and cigarettes were very cheap.

So were guns! I remember reading the gun magazines from about 9 or 10 years old and some of the prices were outrageously low. New Walther PPKs for about $52, used Colt New Services for about $25. and many more.

"for sure miss the people who were in my life who are now gone."
Amen to that. I just got back from visiting my sisters and niece in NYC. We went to the cemetaries for both sides of the family to pay our respects to my parents and grand parents.
 

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"Takes a lot of ingenuity to make things work now...where, in the 1960s, anyone with a Paper Route or other humble Job, could generally afford a decent-enough house in a nice-enough neighborhood, a good used Car, and, have all the Groceries them and their family needed".

This is exactly how it was & even to the 70's for my day. Paid for everything, no stress. Society mongrels have created todays mess.
 

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You know its kind of funny in some respects. I was sitting in a bar one time and this older fella went over to the juke box and somebody said play "The Good Ole Days" and he replied "There weren't any!" I suppose he was being subjective.

But I do remember getting 5 bucks a week from my Mom, which I sort of earned by doing some house chores, etc., and could buy comic books, models, junk food. We could walk to the store, safely! I'm sure that there were all the same social ills we see and hear about today, but it wasn't crammed down our throats with a 24/7 news cycle.

Guns! Ah yes guns, gotta talk about guns. My Dad had a few guns, but not a collection seems raising a family had a priority. But as I grew up, well we; me and my brother; we bought 22s, and then I got an Ithaca M37 for my 16th birthday which I still have. Then in High School he bough me a Ruger Super Blackhawk .44 Magnum for Christmas, and at my request a Colt .45 Automatic for graduation.

All those great time are gones, Mom and Dad are gone, my Sister-in-law, several close friends which died before their time. But I can still recall some "Happy Days".

My Brother and I live together, as we came close to losing everything, but some people did. We had to sell most of our guns out of necessity, but we've been building up our assortment slowly, and go shooting pretty regular. I do the reloading, which I actually don't mind doing.

Sometimes I think of all the "Well if I'd of done this or that...", but seems in how selling of my guns bailed me out a few times, I sometimes wish I've of spent more money on guns.
 

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Where did you live on Long Island? That's where I grew up. Where was the Hollywood Diner? We lived about 5 minutes from Lido Beach. When I got old enough I was a life guard at the public beaches. I'm only 60 and I wasn't driving until about 1967 but I remember gas and cigarettes were very cheap.

So were guns! I remember reading the gun magazines from about 9 or 10 years old and some of the prices were outrageously low. New Walther PPKs for about $52, used Colt New Services for about $25. and many more.

"for sure miss the people who were in my life who are now gone."
Amen to that. I just got back from visiting my sisters and niece in NYC. We went to the cemetaries for both sides of the family to pay our respects to my parents and grand parents.
Lived in Williston Park then Commack, that is where the Hollywood Diner was. I am little older than you, was into drag racing, sometimes hanging at Nathan's in Oceanside. Get to NYC every year now, just love it.
 

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Lived in Williston Park then Commack, that is where the Hollywood Diner was. I am little older than you, was into drag racing, sometimes hanging at Nathan's in Oceanside. Get to NYC every year now, just love it.
Wow! Nathans! That really brings back memories. Commack was east of the 5 Towns. Oceanside was pretty close to us.
Aside from the bad firearms laws and the traffic, NYC is still one of the most interesting places in the US. Great food, culture, and lots of beautiful girls. Just 'cause I'm on a diet it doesn't mean I can't look at the menu. :cool:
 

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Have some fond memories of Long Island..Grew up in Valley Stream during the war. Had a Drive-in movie where we would go and sit in the back wall to watch movies. White Castle hambergers, in those days we were served in the car. Dad worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and would bring home all the things that were rationed..Went to St. Mary's grammer school. When Nathan's moved to Oceanside that was our saturday night spot. Just a few thoughts on my early days..
 

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Have some fond memories of Long Island..Grew up in Valley Stream during the war. Had a Drive-in movie where we would go and sit in the back wall to watch movies. White Castle hambergers, in those days we were served in the car. Dad worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and would bring home all the things that were rationed..Went to St. Mary's grammer school. When Nathan's moved to Oceanside that was our saturday night spot. Just a few thoughts on my early days..
A bit later than you, we used to bike to Valley Stream Mall when we were kids to goof around and eat Chinese food. We also used to get dressed up and take the L.I. railroad to Manhattan when we were about 13 and up. We thought we were grown-ups:cool:
You could do that back then without worrying about getting mugged.
 

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I remember gas at $0.25 a gallon in 1964. I also remember bying my first car NEW in 1969 ?(a plymouth crickett) for I think it was $1700 I paid in cash from money I'd saved working at the family store and in the sawmill.
It seems that although I got paid alot less back then, I could buy alot more. US money had more value it seems.
The hardest changes are seeing all the subdivisons and posted land where I used to shoot, hunt,trap and hike around. Back then alot of the farmers didnt care if i hunted on their land and we could swim in a hundred different holes in the creek and in many differnent lakes and ponds. Cant do that anymore I could fish for miles along the creek and never run into a poster -not now Alot ofthe land got bought up by outof staters from NY and NJ. Oh well thats progress.
 

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Lets face it. The common thread here is we are getting old. I am absolutely stuffed full with nostalgia. I live in the same, small, Virginia town that I grew up in. I distance walk and pass my childhood home at least twice a week. Why? We all know the answer. Whereas we enjoy our lives having lived today, we long for the simpler times of our youth.
 

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Corner candy stores, leaving our screen door unlocked during the summer, and not worrying about it. I remember Troy Lock and company in Plainfield , NJ where I grew up. The owner was a locksmith, but he had a "Case" knife dealership as well. I would save for weeks, to go buy a "Case" Cheetah for a couple bucks. I was like 9-10 years old. We all played "cops and robbers" or "cowboy and indians" , army etc.... We did not have "play dates", "cell phones", computers, TVs with 300+ channels. We shared what we had with our friends and vice versa. We respected our elders, police officers, teachers, etc..... it was a given, because if you did not you a got a foot you know where. We played with bows and arrows, BB guns, slings shots, and did some of the stupidest things young boys could think of. We got scraped knees,and bumps and bruises, we cried and we laughed and we were happy! Sometimes progress ain't what it is cracked to be. Like Quietman said "times were just simpler" back in the day.
 

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Denghis, you know the more I think about it, I don't agree with "progress sucks" though I do agree that we all miss simpler times. I am 56 years of age and work in commercial printing. Progress is going to happen in my world whether I like it or not. I find myself in recent years repeating the mantra "adapt or die". We don't have to like it but you might as well.
 
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