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Thinking of beginning to start reloading, and have been trying to gather some information from the forum here, and I have a question, or three. IS there any truth, or is it just a personal preference that some shooters feel that reloads are bad for thier firearms, and will not use them, and some ranges will not allow them? Or is it based on the ingredients some of the reloaders use?

What kind of people do you hang around with?
Since people have been reloading smokeless powder for well over 100 years and the "ingredients" (components, in the parlance) are the same or almost exactly the same as factory, the hesitation would be
liability. I have NEVER been to a range that did not WELCOME reloaded ammunition. I don't let others, other than family and friends when I am with them, shoot my reloads, and I don't shoot other's reloads.
Reloads have never been bad for any of MY firearms. In fact, I can load down in pressure for accuracy and "work" my guns less than factory rounds.


Second, what is a good starter kit to buy, if you were not in a situation where you had to buy the cheapest one out there, bbut not the most expensive either? Maybe middle of the road? I want to load basic handgun loads along with 10mm, and 5.56/.223 and 7.62x39 on the long gun side. Thanks.

I would read several manuals and make up my own mind. I don't follow the crowd and I don't join cults. I look at what my specific needs are and determine what will work best for me.
Do you need 100 rounds a month? Then, all you need is any single-stage press.
Do you need 500-1000 rounds a month? Then, you need a progressive press.
What you need in a kit for pistols, and this is what you NEED and NOT a bunch of toys, are:
Straight-wall pistol cases
press
die set
cases
bullets
primers
powder
scale to weight the powder
funnel to pour weighed powder into case
You can clean cases perfectly satisfactorily with a rag. All you need to do is remove the dirt, grime, oil, mud from the case exterior.

Bottle-neck rifle cases
Above, plus
a case trimmer like Lee's

Then, later you can get a powder measure and other toys.

Most any kit will give you all you need, you just have to find the press you like. I find a progressive like the Hornady L-N-L is all the progressive I need (though I have three Dillon 1050s just because), but a single-stage is ideal for bottleneck cases.
 
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