Colt Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
Everybody has their own preferences, as do I. You won't go wrong with any quality press. I suggest getting an RCBS Rockchucker single stage press. Not only can you learn the basics of reloading with it, even if you later go to a progressive for increased volume, the single stage press will still be useful for working up new loads or critical loads, or for small volume reloading like hunting rifle loads.

I'll make it easy for you. Buy this:

RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Single Stage Press Kit

This is a set of reloading tools from RCBS that's fairly complete except for dies and components. It's on sale until the end of August, and if you buy enough extra RCBS stuff (dies, for instance) to get over $300 in purchases, you can get a mail-in rebate of $50. That's about as cheap as you're going to get into this hobby with quality stuff.

So, study the reloading manual, go slowly and carefully, and you can craft really good ammo tailored to your needs. If you have any questions when you get started, come back here for really good advice.

Have fun,

Buck
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
  • Read a lot about reloading from different references. But the RCBS book is a good place to start.
  • The press bolts to the bench, and the bench should be substantial. But not necessarily expensive - I built my first reloading bench from 2x4's and two layers of 3/4" C/D plywood fastened together with contact cement.. I also fitted a Formica surface with contact cement to give a better work surface. Make sure to fit a small fence to the back edge to prevent things rolling off.
  • Get a few extra reloading blocks to be able to handle 100 rounds at a time - or 200 rounds total. If the kit doesn't have an impact bullet puller, get one - it's the reloader's eraser. I'd also get some 50 round cases for your reloaded rounds. Four plastic ones will suffice to start. You can also get cardboard ones that are less expensive.
  • 9x19 is OK to start with. Just remember that it is a high pressure round, and that you need to taper crimp pretty hard to keep the bullets in place. Also, watch overall length (OAL) carefully - don't go less that the recommended specs, or longer that that which will fit in the magazine. And don't use lead bullets in Glocks with polygonal rifling - jacketed only.

Buck
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top