Colt Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found this at a LGS for $400 total, may have over paid but I have a weakness for old guns and history. When I was checking it out in the store I saw it had the Canadian Broad Arrow mark, so I figured I needed it.

From what little research I have done so far I believe it has the wrong grips and is missing the lanyard ring from the butt. The serial number is 3725, in searching the web I found a post where another person lettered a similar revolver the 43rd in number earlier than mine. His was shipped April 3, 1900 with 350 in the shipment. In the discussion of the other revolver it was thought they were purchased for use in the Boer War.

The one I purchased has had the cylinder bored for 45 Colt. I disassembled it to clean & all the numbered parts appear to match. The only government mark on it was the one Broad Arrow.

I would be interested in any thoughts, both good & bad.

Thanks
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
12,840 Posts
Hi bofg,


Stocks may well be WWI Era Colt ( New Service ) model of 1917.

Although I believe one could order plain Walnut Stocks, any time ( back then ).

The conversion to .45 Colt - does it appear to have included any shaving of the rear of the Cylinder? Or, any removal of material from the general Recoil Area of the Frame?

In theory, the really 'early' ones like this - one would intend to be extra careful not to drop the Revolver when fully Loaded, since, if it lands on the Hammer in the right way, if dropped onto a hard surface, it may fire inconveniently. ( Not that we all should not be extra careful all the time anyway! But, just sayin'...)

Should be an excellent all round Side Arm!

The Barrel Bore and Cylinder Bores will likely prefer .454 or so Bullets, and pure Lead.

Modern off the shelf .45 Colt Ammunition tends to be .452-ish and or hard alloys or semi-jacketed and so on, which will invite lots of Blow By, possible 'Leading', and or poor Accuracy.

Side-plate should have a Circular 'Logo' containing the words "Colts New Service" or something like that.

I could not tell in the images, if this is present.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I haven't had a chance to try to fire it yet, a 45 Long Colt does fit, I don't have any 455 Eley to try. It appears to me that the area of the cylinder where the rounds are inserted might have been bored a so the rim of the 45 Colt fits into the cylinder. It appears this was done quite a while back. I tried to photograph it but will try gain with better lighting.

The side plate does have the logo with the words but it is fairly worn, you can make out the words "New Service".
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
12,840 Posts
Ejector Star looks pretty darned nice! Not much deformation or wear there to my Eye.

Okay...Cylinder not 'shaved'...the slight 'recessing' yours shows, is a much nicer method for the 'conversion' anyway, so, you have the best, most polite method of all, there, in this Revolver's example.

The .455 Eley will ( still ) fit the Cylinder Chambers perfectly for diameter but will be some ways shorter in length than the .45 Colt Cartridge is.

And, the .455 Eley had a thinner Cartridge Rim ( hence, the rim thickness issue, in adapting the Revolver for .45 Colt, having had to be solved in this instance, via a slight recess in the Cylinder Chamber mouths, where otherwise it would have been done via shaving the rear of the Cylinder, or removing material from the recoil shield area ).

I am thinking your Revolver has been re-Finished sometime long ago. I do not know anything about Canadian Arsenal R.M.C.P. re-finishing, but, maybe, others here may. If it was re-finished, it was done without recourse to any hard Buffing and without dubbing the edges of the Side-Plate/Frame meet.

Barrel Texts on top appear a little eroded in the mid area between the two lines...Barrel side Calibre Text appears a little wan...the Circular Logo of the Side-Plate, would not tend to be reduced by any kind of normal wear, but would tend to be reduced or dimmed by leveling with abrasives and Buffing, as when wishing to remove tiny pitting from rust.

Possibly some leveling and Buffing was done in some areas only, if in fact it had been re-Finished back-when.

The vestigial Blue seen, I would expect to be of a less matte character if 'original', especially in protected areas.

The Blue I am seeing on your Revolver, seems to have a slight 'Chalkboard' or 'flat' look. And appears to be 'over' evidence of wear or mild buffing, of the stamped Texts.


Have you pulled the Side-Plate, and, cleaned in there, and oiled or Greased everything up really well?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Yes, I took it completely down & cleaned everything. I did find that below the serial number a ampersand mark is stamped. I have read that sometimes that means a rework by Colt, but I am not certain that is what it means, only what I have read.

Thanks for the information.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,300 Posts
Found this at a LGS for $400 total, may have over paid but I have a weakness for old guns and history. When I was checking it out in the store I saw it had the Canadian Broad Arrow mark, so I figured I needed it.

From what little research I have done so far I believe it has the wrong grips and is missing the lanyard ring from the butt. The serial number is 3725, in searching the web I found a post where another person lettered a similar revolver the 43rd in number earlier than mine. His was shipped April 3, 1900 with 350 in the shipment. In the discussion of the other revolver it was thought they were purchased for use in the Boer War.

The one I purchased has had the cylinder bored for 45 Colt. I disassembled it to clean & all the numbered parts appear to match. The only government mark on it was the one Broad Arrow.

I would be interested in any thoughts, both good & bad.

Thanks
I also have a weakness for old guns and history. I know what you mean.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,521 Posts
Hi bofg,

I think you did just fine. You have a much more practical decent condition shooter in 45 Colt w/o having to pay for a conversion.

Oyeboten has supplied excellent information. I believe it's quite likely that the Colt factory did the conversion since it's the very best way to do it short of a new 45 Colt cylinder. And those were not always on hand at the factory. They can't make just one, machinery is set up and then parts are run in batches. Once they're gone, that's it until another batch is run. And once the gun is obsolete no more parts are run. So if it went back to Colt after it was an obsolete model, the rechambering of the existing cylinder is the best solution, just as done by S&W under similar circumstances.

And the beauty is, because the 455 Mk II cartridge has a larger diameter rim than the 45 Colt, it will not fit down into the Colt chamber recess. So it can still be fired correctly and safely and have proper headspace in your gun.

Jim
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
7,148 Posts
I had a 1915 Colt NS that had the E stamp on the inside of the grip frame and it also had many british stamps as well. It was originally chambered in .455 and was overstamped 45 Colt. It was altered the same way. So both 45 Colt and 455 would still chamber and function. I shot it with reloads and .454 diameter bullets that worked will. It appears now that collectors prefer the guns un-altered.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
You asked for thoughts good & bad: I don't have any bad thoughts at all about a gun like that. You got one of my all-time favorite revolvers at a great price and it's got a little history to boot. What's not to like about that? Hope you enjoy it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the comments & information. I don't have any 455 Eley but I am going to try to come up with a few. I would like to try those.

I plan on getting a letter on this, I think it will probably letter the same as the one I saw on another forum but I think it would be interesting to have.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
I have a NS in .455 and it is really cool. The 455 case is about the length of a 45GAP and factory loads run about 650fps. It's like shooting a gigantic 22. Very little, if any, recoil at all. I'd have to look at my labels but I shoot loads that are about 800fps. It shoots better than I can with .454 lead but with .451-2s it's card table distances only.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
$400 ?? You did OK for a rechambered .455. Neat old shooter.
IMHO the conversion possibly done by importer way back when in the 1950's/early '60's. Lots of .455 revolvers converted to the more popular caliber. 45ACP for the Webleys,45 Colt for the New Services and S&W.Had a New Service converted in the same fashion,UK rebuild,WWI date.The wood grip might be part of UK rebuild,the British armourers did make replacement grips for the New Service .
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top