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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just got a Colt New Army from 1906 in .32-20. You can drop the cocked hammer simply by applying any amount of pressure. My first thought is a worn sear. Could it be anything else...even dirt or dried grease causing the trouble?

The seller is a good guy that I've bought other guns from online. He's offering a full refund. However, it is a scarce enough variation that I think I'll have it repaired. (He's willing to pay for that also.)



Best,
Charles
 

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If it were mine, I would do a careful dis assembly, cleaning, and inspection.

Otherwise, who knows?

As far as anyone competent to work on a New Army / New Navy, there's almost no one out there who would, or who should, even if they 'would'.

Is this the one which just sold on Gunbroker very recently?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This one was on Gunauction.com a few weeks ago. My gunsmith can fix it. But, a good cleaning might make a difference. Jack First carries the parts.
 

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Old "Wax Hard" Grease, foreign matter, combinations of these, can make for odd or goofy troubles in the Mechanism even if all is actually just fine Mechanically, otherwise.

So, a careful dis-mantle, clean everything very well, and inspect...re-assemble with fresh Lube, and see.
 

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Give it a good cleaning first. Built up debris could easily affect the interaction of trigger sear and hammer cocking notch.

If it's not debris, then it is most likely the sear. If enough is left, all you would have to do is re-cut it properly. Of course this is granted everything else is kosher, if it isn't then more problems might exist. A good examination from someone skilled with these revolvers is probably necessary if a good cleaning doesn't fix it.

I have also heard of re-nickel jobs causing push off too, due to having the trigger/hammer plated with everything else.
 
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Another cause of push-off is lightning the mainspring to get a lighter trigger pull.

The "fix" may be no more than knowledgeable stoning of the double action sear point of the trigger.
Before alterations inspect the hammer SA notch for alteration or wear.

The Kuhnhausen Colt Revolver Shop Manual Volume One shows how to correct push-off in the later E&I frame models using a 6 inch stone. This is fairly easy IF you do it correctly and carefully, and is probably done the same way in the New Army models.
 

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Another cause of push-off is lightning the mainspring to get a lighter trigger pull.
Going to pick your brain a second DFW, as I like learning about theory just as much as hands on.

I see the "spring lightening" claim used often as a possible reason for push-off, for both S&W and Colt revolvers. Now, I have only been able to read and study the Kuhnhausen manual for Colt V springs, but for S&W's I have many other gunsmithing resources beside the shop manual such as AGI videos with Bob Dunlap.

In the S&W trigger job video, Bob goes over the theory of trigger sear/cocking notch engagements. The trigger sear needs cut so that it gives "positive" engagement of the cocking notch. As long as this is done, the presence or influence of the springs have no effect on push-off. The trigger sear and cocking notch should stay engaged with no springs in the gun, if they have positive engagement.

I've never seen this actually discussed about Colts before, but I'm almost sure the Colt V spring sear and cocking notch are also designed for "positive" engagement, and therefore springs or not, push-off should not be exhibited unless something is out of spec ruining that positive engagement.

Thoughts?
 

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I saw a few Colt's that were brand new that the owner had bent the mainspring to lighten the trigger pull, and that had push off.

I suspect the trigger sear was slightly out of spec right from the factory and as long as the spring was full strength it would pass the factory fitters and final inspectors tests.
After the new owner bent the spring he'd get push off.
In most cases I recommended sending the gun back to Colt.

I could have corrected it, but with a brand new gun I just figured the owner should deal with Colt. Admittedly, part of that was to make the owner "own up" to doing things he shouldn't be doing.
These were rare occurrences and most all were Colt Pythons.
In other cases where an owner bent the spring, or I did the gun would pass the push off test easily.

So, I suspect trigger sear angle was slightly off right from the factory.
Looking back, I can't recall a single case of a verified new from the factory Colt hammer that had a defective single action notch.
 

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So, I suspect trigger sear angle was slightly off right from the factory.
Looking back, I can't recall a single case of a verified new from the factory Colt hammer that had a defective single action notch.
I've had to re-cut about 5 trigger sears to date.

2 Pythons, 1 Detective, 1 SAA, and 1 S&W 629.

Most of those were factory errors in my opinion, especially the SAA which was completely improper.

You are correct though, lightening the springs will induce push-off, but only if other parts are out of factory spec.
 
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