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In one sense the new 2020 Python trigger is a step back in time to the 1950's.
Back then Colt revolvers had the same fine grooves on the trigger that were often too sharp for some people.
In the 60's they changed to the larger 3 grooved design, now they went back to the 50's.

The "fix" is to lightly break the sharp edges, being careful to keep metal dust out of the action.
You can do this with fine wet or dry sand cloth on a wood dowel, or use a power tool like a Dremel and a rubber abrasive "bullet" or cylinder shape.
In all cases WRAP THE ENTIRE FRAME IN THAT AREA WITH TAPE TO PROTECT FROM A SLIP.
Tape is cheap and easy....."Removing" a scar caused by a slip is neither.
 

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I took the trigger out of my 3 inch, clamped it in a vise and went at it with a Dremel. The grooves are now just faint lines but its nice and smooth. I need to replenish my bits and polish so I can do the 4 inch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The ridges just seem counter to the
general practice since at least the
1980s to use smooth triggers. It would
seem for DA work this is what most
shooters prefer.

One notable exception is Jerry Miculek,
the speed exhibition shooter, who says
he prefers a grooved or ridged trigger.
 

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2022 SST Colt Python w/6" barrel
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You guys aren't kidding! STOP! What abrasive cloth are you using to overcome the resistance of hardened SST? We're not sanding on our special Pine Wood Derby car. Sanding and using other mechanical means on a 1700.00 gun takes #@&&'s.
 

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You guys aren't kidding! STOP! What abrasive cloth are you using to overcome the resistance of hardened SST? We're not sanding on our special Pine Wood Derby car. Sanding and using other mechanical means on a 1700.00 gun takes #@&&'s.
Although I don't have a problem with the contact surface on any trigger, I have used whatever means necessary to fine tune various issues in many cases where metal had to be removed or smoothed out. Files, all grades of sandpaper, emery cloth, steel wool, many grades of stones, are in my little bag of tricks. If I had to have a gunsmith for every little problem, I would be going backwards. It ain't the money really.....they are just guns......whatever it takes to keep 'em in action is worth the effort of understanding the problem and fixing it if I can.
I'm not a gunsmith, but I will work on my own equipment if the issue is within my ability to correct. You must have the right tools, and some dexterity. It helps to have an open mind when trying to understand mechanical problems.
I treat it as a traditional thing that gun guys have done since the creation of firearms.
I have not hacked any of 'em to death yet, although I have had some things spread out on the bench for weeks before I got it right. Naturally these are the intensely stressful cases that seem to take a lot outa me. Fortunately, I know when to take a break or just stop and get expert assistance. A man has gotta know his limits......
 

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2022 SST Colt Python w/6" barrel
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Although I don't have a problem with the contact surface on any trigger, I have used whatever means necessary to fine tune various issues in many cases where metal had to be removed or smoothed out. Files, all grades of sandpaper, emery cloth, steel wool, many grades of stones, are in my little bag of tricks. If I had to have a gunsmith for every little problem, I would be going backwards. It ain't the money really.....they are just guns......whatever it takes to keep 'em in action is worth the effort of understanding the problem and fixing it if I can.
I'm not a gunsmith, but I will work on my own equipment if the issue is within my ability to correct. You must have the right tools, and some dexterity. It helps to have an open mind when trying to understand mechanical problems.
I treat it as a traditional thing that gun guys have done since the creation of firearms.
I have not hacked any of 'em to death yet, although I have had some things spread out on the bench for weeks before I got it right. Naturally these are the intensely stressful cases that seem to take a lot outa me. Fortunately, I know when to take a break or just stop and get expert assistance. A man has gotta know his limits......
So have you removed the serrations on your Python trigger? Point is, if the first series had them back in '55...then why 67 years later are they an issue?
 

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You guys aren't kidding! STOP! What abrasive cloth are you using to overcome the resistance of hardened SST? We're not sanding on our special Pine Wood Derby car. Sanding and using other mechanical means on a 1700.00 gun takes #@&&'s.
I am using a Dremel with various bits and sanding drums, takes too long to do it by hand. I also shoot the crap out of my pythons and they have been carried outdoors in all weather conditions. I bought a tool not some magical talisman. I'm not scared to make my tools work for me. There are some things I will let a professional smith do like chamfer the chambers mainly because I don't have the necessary shop tools to work with.

As to why I am getting rid of the grooves, several years ago I came close to crushing the end of my trigger finger off. It is numb for the most part and have most of the function, but it became very sensitive where the trigger lands on my finger and a grooved trigger is very painful even for just a few shots. I don't have that issue with a smooth trigger.
 
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