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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever tried to bore out a .357 Python barrel and sleeve it in .22lr, then install it on a Colt Officer Model Match 22.
 

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I've seen several that were done, and it looks like a good conversion.

The only thing that's really "sticky" is you have to heli-arc up the top strap of the frame so the Python's barrel ramp matches the frame.

Shoot-ability, appearance, and accuracy on the few I saw was great.

On several of them, the "357 CTG" markings were removed and ".22 LR" was stamped in place.

There were two methods of doing this, one simply milled the lettering off, leaving a shallow groove on the barrel, in which the ".22 LR" marks were stamped.

On another, the lettering was removed by grinding and polishing which didn't leave a groove.
However, it did leave a noticeable "flat" spot on the barrel.

I would have preferred the groove.

When finished, the only way a casual observer could tell it wasn't a .357 Python, was the barrel markings, the .22 cylinder with the groove at the rear, and the hammer which has a slightly different profile, due to the hammer mounted firing pin.

The neatest job drilled the barrel out so the slightly protruding muzzle of the Python barrel was removed.
The barrel liner was allowed to extend slightly in the same manner, and solved the problem of how to disguise the front end.

The liner was "stepped" at the rear to prevent any chance of the liner moving forward.

I didn't ask about how the barrel was threaded for the frame, whether the liner was threaded and the outer Python barrel was just a shroud, or whether the original barrel threads were used.

One owner told me he thought the builder had used the original Officer's Model Match barrel.
He'd apparently turned the barrel down to a straight cylinder, and fitted the Python barrel over the original as a shroud.

He probably attached the Python shroud with either soft solder or Loctite.

In any event, since Colt rolled over on us and never produced the promised, (and advertised) .22 Python, this is as close as you can get.

[This message has been edited by dfariswheel (edited 12-10-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It seems to me that you could heli-arc over the .357 roll marks and rescribe it with .22lr. It also appears that the rear of the ventilated rib could have a small vertical groove milled into it where a filler piece could be pinned into it after the barrel is installed. I think it would look great. I had never seen one before.
 

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It seems to me that you could heli-arc over the .357 roll marks and rescribe it with .22lr. It also appears that the rear of the ventilated rib could have a small vertical groove milled into it where a filler piece could be pinned into it after the barrel is installed. I think it would look great. I had never seen one before.
 

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The weight of this ".22 Python" would be tremendous! I have a full size Great Western .22lr. SAA, 5 1/2"bbl and weight is 45 oz. versus 39 oz. for a similiar .357 "Atomic". Rock steady hold I would bet. Bud
 

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Heavy, yes, but ultra heavy .22 pistols shoot great.

I always had excellent results with the Colt Trooper Mark III, .22LR with a 6" barrel.

These worked REALLY good, especially in double action.

The Mark III was a big revolver to start with, and the massive cylinder and barrel with those tiny .22 holes really were heavy, but in double action, the gun just "laid" there.

The DA technique was to "stage" the trigger.
Once the massive cylinder started to rotate, inertia would rotate it all the way to lockup on the next chamber.

The remaining trigger pull was smooth and light.

I stupidly sold the last of the 6" models, but I still have a like-new 4" that's nearly as good.

For just sheer shooting, the Python .22 would be great.

As for HOW it would be built, the price of the gun, Python barrel, and gunsmith fees would dictate that the build would have to be a top-quality job.

On a project like this, cutting corners just wouldn't make sense.

I SHOULD have had my machinist guy help me do one of these when I was still working.

My version would have been a 6" with a hard chrome plated finish.
 
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