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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I finally took the advice of folks on the forum and went and shot my 1969 4" nickel colt python yesterday. It shot beautifully with both 38's and .357 shells.

However....

At the range, I noticed it seemed a bit tougher to eject the spent 357 shells than the 38's - they were more "stuck" than the 38's. Wondering if the gun was refinished that made the chambers a bit tighter?

When I got home to clean my beauty, my heart stopped. I've lost some of the nickel finish on the cylinder that look like 'chips' fell off. Does that mean my Python, which I assumed was nearly unfired before has either a flaw or has it been refinished in it's past?

See the pix below - any thoughts from the team here?

Should I try to get it fixed by refinishing from Colt? Should I continue to shoot her or will it get worse? I had this magnificently shiny Python now I feel a bit defeated.

Any advice?
I'm just mortified...
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Kraaaken
 

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Kraaak

I don't necessarily think it is a sure sign it has been refinished, though that very well may be true. I'm sure the factory nickel is succeptable to this type of thing particularly if it has been subjected to a certain chemical it did not like. I know the manufacturer of Flitz does not recommend using their product on Nickel finishes for this very reason yet tens of thousands use it on Nickel.

The good news is having the cylinder refinished is the best case scenerio. No roll stamps, no dished screws, easily fixed. Inexpensive in my opinion also.

Sometimes certain types of Ammo affect Nickel also but judging by your photos that is not the case here.
 

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I agree with keystone , of all the places this could have happened this is best. I have seen other nickel revs that werent refin. do the same thing in the same place. Take the cylinder off have it redone and smile again, u still have a nice python. Not the end of the world.
 

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"At the range, I noticed it seemed a bit tougher to eject the spent 357 shells than the 38's - they were more "stuck" than the 38's. Wondering if the gun was refinished that made the chambers a bit tighter?"

Since the 38 Spl casing is shorter than the 357, when shooting the 38's, a small ring of residue is deposited in the cylinder at the end of the casing. When the 357 cartridges are chambered and fired, this buildup of residue makes the 357 cases harder to extract. A good cleaning of the chambers will take care of this problem.
 

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If this Python wears its original Colt Nickel finish, would there be a copper base finish revealed in the area of nickel flaking? Did Colt use a copper base finish on its nickel guns in the 60s? I have a few nickel Pythons that exhibit a minor amount of nickel flaking in the recoil shield area around the latch pin. The copper base finish is quite evident under this flaking.

Sorry to hear about your problem and wish you the best of luck in getting back in shape.
 

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About 1980 I bought my first SAA , a 1967 .45 4.75" nickel . It was used but not abused maybe 95% . The nickel on the cylinder was starting to do the same thing although not quite as badly . It shot great and every trip to the range would result in just a little more peeling . About 15 yrs later I decided to freshen it up so I sent it to Colt for a refinish . It came back so fresh that I didn't want to shoot it any more for fear of spoiling it :eek:

I'm not sure Colt is accepting any refinish jobs at this time but I'm sure one of the fine shops can do it proud .
 

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I'd send it in to Colt for a refinish.
Last I heard they're not taking refinish work until August, but for a short wait you'll get a genuine Colt factory job that they'll warranty.
 

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I would send it back to Colt. The only other tidbit I can give is do not use Hoppe's or any other cleaning solvent that uses ammonia. I undestand that ammonia has a tendancy of causing the nickle finish to flake. It seems that ammonia can get into microscopic cracks and loosen the nickle finish.
 

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Ammonia attacks the copper alloy, especially the base plate the nickel is applied over. Bore cleaners contain ammonia to remove copper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks - just been using CLP to clean it, but I did use Pre-Lim and Renaisance wax - i'll see if Pre-lim has ammonia....will be sending back to colt as soon as they start taking orders again.
 
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