Colt Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I could use some advice if anyone has experience in this area. I am going to get my Python out of the safe and start carrying it on occasion. I need a nice leather belt or crossdraw holster. My only good experiences have been with Mitch Rosen for a smaller gun, and a Bianchi X-15 for the Python. I have read a little about Milt Sparks, and Lou Alessi, but have no real knowledge of them. Anyone have a holster they can recommend to be both comfortable, and protect the Colt?
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
dfariswheel,
Do you think the tight fitting hand boned holsters would create more wear from being in constant contact, or less, because the gun is stationary and not moving around? I like the idea of the leather carvings and etchings on the western holsters, but they all seem to have a pretty loose fit. (My search has to be done via the internet.)
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
ive had three hundred dollars damage done to my pre 1970 national match by a standard holster.. right down to the snap wear on the slide.. the gun would be worth 200 dollars more if i knew 35 years ago what i know now.. evidently all this holster stuff has been around for a long time, espesially in the single action guns.. someone found out some time ago that to put (american tanned) horsehide with the smooth side out (INSIDE) on the inside of the holster. it wont wear the bluing off a gun.. ive had my cimmeron .45 in my custom horse hide lined holster for a year shotting it many times with less than 3 percent wear.. very very little.. if you have a fine gun talk to holster maikers until ones says "of course i use horse hide liners" (american tanned.) if they give you a strange look, dont bother with them, .mexican tanned leather usese urine int the process and its cheap and strips bluin off the gun.. .. good luck dave..
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
Virtually any good, quality holster will work fine.

I'd go down to the local gunshop and ask to see their holster catalogs, or the wholesaler catalog they order holsters from.

Also do a search on-line for holster company's web catalogs.

Pick something that looks good to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
El Paso Saddlery mad two Holsters for me. One for a Blued Python and another for a S&W mod 66f_comp. Both FIT the revolvers are nicely, heck beautifully, finished and lined and Have that Snap in feel. Don't remember the model but they are both pancake style with retention strap and offer excellant concealment. Since I alternate daily between the two in the winter I haven't seen any marked loss of finish on the Python.
Good stuff and worth every penny I've spent.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
Friction is what wears gun finishes.
The old time holsters were usually made of flabby, soft leather that covered almost the entire pistol.

While this did the main job of preventing the gun from falling out of the holster, the near 100% contact and the loose fit just ATE gun blue.

When a gun is holstered there's going to be finish wear no matter what material is used, but a loose holster allows the gun to shift, and this accelerates the wear and tear.

When a holster gets dirty or gritty inside, and especially when a holster is used past it's service life, the inside becomes virtually a fine sandpaper.

Many people won't use plastic holsters because they do wear the finish faster, BUT ONLY on the areas were the gun actually makes contact.

A good Kydex holster only makes contact in critical areas, and those areas on the gun do wear quickly.
However, the wear is self-limiting, and ONLY those areas wear, so plastic actually causes LESS overall wear than any leather.

The worst holsters are soft "flabby" models, those with the swede linings, and holsters that are either loose to start with, or is used past it's service life and allows the gun to shift around.

The best holsters are those that are made of almost plastic-like hard leather, have a smooth-face leather lining, or have the inner face finished smooth.

A good holster will normally be too tight until broken in, but once broken in, the gun actually "snaps" into place, and doesn't shift around.

Most of the modern top line holster companies meet these criteria.
I can recommend leather holsters made by any top makers like Bianchi, Galco, SafariLand, Rossin, Del Fatti, or any of the others.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top