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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About three wks. ago i purchased a stainless Python ( 1991 vintage). Ive noticed it has marks in the recess in the recoil shield from the ratchet. They are light and the cylinder has no end play.My concern is this a problem or something that shows up after several rounds? Is this something that will get worse quickly?

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I would say normal / not a problem without endshake as you claim. Dfariswheel may have the last word. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
And welcome to the forum. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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Having a "shadow" of the ratchet on a well-fired Colt is more or less normal.
Every time the gun is fired, the ratchet impacts the frame, and this has to leave a mark.

Where there's trouble is when the marks are noticeable impacted INTO the frame.
This is known as "ratchet peening" and is a sign of either the gun being fired long after end shake should have been corrected, OR shooting over-pressure hot loads.

Your first step is to try to identify whether this is normal marking or it's early ratchet peening.
Look for excess end shake and signs the gun has been shooting hot loads.

The .357 Magnum is plenty hot, but some fools just HAVE to try for the "blow down the barn door" custom loaded rounds.

In any case a ratchet peened gun is one to steer clear of.
 

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icdux1 had posted some in an earlier thread, but the images are not available now. Perhaps he still has them. Those were the only ones that I found. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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Here's a quick picture taken on a Colt Python 8" - the one I shoot most.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Woodsmith, great pic. mine is slightly heavier than this. I can just start to catch a dental pick in the marking. Again no end play.
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Great info guys!
The picture quality A1.
Checked my Trooper (old model) has the same type of marks as the photo.
The marks are heavier at the 6:00 o'clock position and less at the 12:00 o'clock.
Is this normal on all Colt revolvers.
Does anyone know why the marks would not be the same clear around?
Love my Trooper!!!!!!!
 

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Hey folks, rather than start a new thread, I am piggy backing this one with a similar theme.
I recently was sussing up a stainless steel Python from 1983 vintage. (Pach Colt grips not Colt wood grips-did a separate search on that)
Although I did not buy it, I was wondering about two things.

One is that the stainless sample has what seems like a hole below the rear sight retaining screw that appears to go through the top strap. My blued Python only shares the minor concave machining at this area but has no pronounced orifice at the top strap underside. Attached is a picture of the stainless example and a picture of a blued example. Both Pythons.
So were some drilled all the way through? (stainless barrel top had no scope mount holes or marks on the vent rib)

One other thing. The stainless had star marks on the breech face (recoil shield) and a very black/dirty interior of forcing cone. (faint flame cutting) Also some cartridge ghost marks. Any opinions?
Thanks.

recoil shield ss.jpg recoil shield compare.jpg
 

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One thing you have to remember is that Stainless Steel is NOT has hard as Forged Steel. The "ghost" marks or as "dfariswheel" states as "shadows" are due to the stainless steel not being as hard and the "ghosts" will show up. The End Shake is critical in the these revolvers too, just keep an eye when cleaning, and if you feel any excessive End Shake that begins to show up, have it checked out.

Keep ammo to normal SAMMI standards and with little end shake, you will be good to go for years.
 

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Thank Abwehr ! Although I did not buy the stainless, that is good information and good tips for stainless revolvers in general.

I am still curious about the underside of the top strap.

Academic curiosity....
 

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Every Colt I can remember seeing had the rear sight elevation screw drilled all the way through the frame.
One of the first post-war DA Colt's with adjustable Accro rear sight was the Colt original Trooper of 1953. These had the hole all the way through, so that was the practice from the get-go.
Sometimes the hole is covered by fouling and isn't obvious.

Usually the hole wasn't as rough as the picture of the stainless Python.
This might simply be the result of a dulling drill that was about to the point of needing to be replaced.

Anytime you see faint ratchet marks or the faint shadow of cartridge case heads on the frame, that's simply and indication that the gun has been shot, more then just a little.
It's not a good indication of excessive shooting since more then just a few boxes will start leaving these normal wear marks.
Where you back away is when the ratchet marks are more deeply impressed into the frame face.
If you buy a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's "Colt Double Action Revolvers, Volume One" he has good pictures of what excess ratchet peening looks like.
Buy the book from Brownell's or Midway.
 

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Every Colt I can remember seeing had the rear sight elevation screw drilled all the way through the frame.
One of the first post-war DA Colt's with adjustable Accro rear sight was the Colt original Trooper of 1953. These had the hole all the way through, so that was the practice from the get-go.
Sometimes the hole is covered by fouling and isn't obvious.

Usually the hole wasn't as rough as the picture of the stainless Python.
This might simply be the result of a dulling drill that was about to the point of needing to be replaced.

Anytime you see faint ratchet marks or the faint shadow of cartridge case heads on the frame, that's simply and indication that the gun has been shot, more then just a little.
It's not a good indication of excessive shooting since more then just a few boxes will start leaving these normal wear marks.
Where you back away is when the ratchet marks are more deeply impressed into the frame face.
If you buy a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's "Colt Double Action Revolvers, Volume One" he has good pictures of what excess ratchet peening looks like.
Buy the book from Brownell's or Midway.
Aha ! You are most likely correct about the hole covered by fouling. I have never put a 'pick' to that 'covered' spot on my personal Python.

Thanks for the book reference. I have the book and will refer to your suggested "ratchet peening" section !

Thanks.
 
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