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Yes.
The hammer's double action strut is replaced with a special strut that has a roller on the end.
The trigger's sear shelf is altered to a rounded shape and the hammer is modified.

The gun must be converted to a double action-only setup and cannot be converted back without replacing the hammer and trigger.

The unit was not available as an accessory, and had to be installed by Sherman.
 

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Some years back a gundealer/friend handed me an ordinary looking Python and said "Try this". It had unbelievably smooth action and with no stacking, unlike any Python I had ever shot. I recall he said that bearings had been used in tuning the gun. In reading the archives of the Colt Forun or Pistolsmith forum I came across the term 'roller action tuning' by a gunsmith named Walt Sherman. Does this 'roller action tuning' have anything to do with bearings or rollers?
 

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Thank you for the information, that is more than likely the modification done on that gun. I always found it interesting that Colt advertised the Python as the worlds finest handgun the same time the Colt Custom Shop advertised to custom tune and polish your Python action. I wondered why the worlds finest handgun needed extra polishing. In any case, I've always felt that the Python was the most elegant of all double action revolvers.
 

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As Dfariswheel states the hammer strut is altered to have a roller on the end. Unlike the roller action conversions of Cylinder & Slide for S&W revolvers the Walt Sherman roller action does retain the single action feature both on his conversions for the Python and the pre-MIM S&W K, L and N frames. I had (wish it was not past tense) both a Python and an N frame S&W he converted.

On another forum or here someone mentioned once that a friend had an early conversion on a Python that did not always roll smoothly. As this is third hand knowledge take it for what it is worth.

Supposedly, the roller bearing allows a lighter double action pull due to reduced friction. On my Python the double action was about 6.5 pounds and it would fire magnum primers and single action was about 3 pounds. There was a writeup on the Sherman conversion in American Handgunner sometime in the early '90's in the same issue that had an article by Massad Ayoob on his Pythons and some that were tuned by people such as Jerry Moran. How much the roller action reduces the double action trigger pull I do not know but would not think it is too much. I have seen others claim they can get the double action into the 6 pound range and work without the roller action.

There are a number of ways to remove the stacking in the trigger pull. Some affect the single action and some do not. I have heard of at least 4 different methods.



[This message has been edited by Bigboar (edited 07-09-2005).]
 

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It has been decades now since the double action [Colt or otherwise] has been the first choice weapon in the military, police or civilian marketplace. Dispite that, it's nice to learn some gunsmiths are still capable of making a good product better. Thanks for the information.
 

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The unfortunate part about Colt revolvers is that the "master gunsmiths" are rapidly disappearing. I don't know if Walt Sherman still works on handguns. Austin Behlert is retired and his son-in-law that took over the shop recently died. Reeves Jungkind down in Texas I hear has retired and Jerry Moran hasn't worked on Pythons in years. That essentially leaves Cylinder & Slide and Dave Berryhill (over at pistolsmith.com) but last I heard he has devoted himself to the 1911.
 

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I am sorry to hear that. Unfortunately, because of legislation, litigation and loss of markets, young people considering going into gunsmithing as a career face an uncertain future.
 
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